Marquesas Islands | demographics

Demographics

Historical population

1799 1853 1863 1872 1883 1892 1902 1911 1921 1926 1931 1936
50,000 to
100,000
11,900 8,650 6,045 5,576 4,445 3,963 3,116 2,300 2,255 2,283 2,400
1946 1956 1962 1971 1977 1983 1988 1996 2002 2007 2012 2017
2,976 4,165 4,838 5,593 5,419 6,548 7,358 8,064 8,548 8,632 9,264 9,346
Past estimates and official figures from past censuses.[2][15][18][19][20][21]

Migrations

The places of birth of the 8,632 residents of the Marquesas Islands at the 2007 census were the following:[22]

Language

Loading copra on a boat in the bay of Hane, Ua Huka island.

French and Tahitian are the only official languages of all of French Polynesia, but the Marquesan languages, in their various forms, remain the primary means of communication among residents within this archipelago.

Marquesan is a collection of East-Central Polynesian dialects, of the Marquesic group, spoken in the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia. They are usually classified into two groups, North Marquesan and South Marquesan, corresponding roughly along geographic lines.

The North Marquesan dialects are spoken on the islands of Ua Pu and Nuku Hiva, and South Marquesan dialects on the islands of ʻOa, Tahuata and Fatu Hiva. The dialects of Ua Huka are often incorrectly classified as North Marquesan; they are instead transitional. While the island is in the northern Marquesas group, the dialects show more morphological and phonological affinities with South Marquesan. The North Marquesan dialects are sometimes considered to be two separate languages: North Marquesan and Tai Pi Marquesan, the latter being spoken in the valleys of the eastern third of the island of Nuku Hiva, in the ancient province of Tai Pi.

The most striking feature of the Marquesan languages is their almost universal replacement of the /r/ or /l/ of other Polynesian languages by a /ʔ/ (glottal stop).

Like other Polynesian languages, the phonology of Marquesan languages is characterised by a paucity of consonants and a comparative abundance of vowels.

2007 language data in census

At the 2007 census, 94.1% of the population whose age was 15 and older reported that they could speak French. 90.2% reported that they could also read and write it. Only 4.4% of the population whose age was 15 and older had no knowledge of French.[23]

At the same census, 67.8% of the population whose age was 15 and older reported that the language they spoke the most at home was Marquesan. 30.1% reported that French was the language they spoke the most at home. 1.4% reported Tahitian, and 0.7% reported another language.[24]

7.2% of the population whose age was 15 and older reported that they had no knowledge of any Polynesian language at the 2007 census.[23]

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Marquesaseilande
العربية: جزر ماركيساس
asturianu: Islles Marqueses
Bân-lâm-gú: Marquises Kûn-tó
brezhoneg: Inizi Markiz
čeština: Markézy
Deutsch: Marquesas
Ελληνικά: Νήσοι Μαρκέζας
español: Islas Marquesas
Esperanto: Markizinsuloj
euskara: Markesak
føroyskt: Marquesasoyggjar
français: Îles Marquises
Gàidhlig: Na Marquesas
Hawaiʻi: Nuʻuhiwa
Bahasa Indonesia: Kepulauan Marquesas
italiano: Isole Marchesi
עברית: איי מרקיז
latviešu: Marķīza salas
lietuvių: Markizo salos
македонски: Маркиски Острови
Bahasa Melayu: Kepulauan Marquesas
Nederlands: Marquesaseilanden
norsk nynorsk: Marquesasøyane
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Markiz orollari
polski: Markizy
Gagana Samoa: Marquesas
Simple English: Marquesas Islands
српски / srpski: Маркиска острва
татарча/tatarça: Маркиз утраулары
Türkçe: Markiz Adaları
українська: Маркізькі острови
Tiếng Việt: Quần đảo Marquises