Calendar (New Style) Act 1750 | notes

Notes

  1. ^ Scotland had changed to a 1 January start in 1600.
  2. ^ The Act makes no reference to Gregory, since to do so might imply recognition of Papal primacy. It acknowledges the inconvenience of having a differing system from neighbouring countries and recognises the error in the Julian calendar. It defined a calendar identical to the Gregorian system, from first principles.
  3. ^ "An unusual calendar is printed for September 1752. That is the month 11 days were skipped to make up for lack of leap year adjustments" (Solaris manual and Cal (Unix)#Features).
  4. ^ "Each of the four days fixed by custom as marking off the quarters of the year, ... the payment of rent and other quarterly charges fall due, ... In England ... the quarter days are traditionally Lady Day (March 25), ..." Oxford English Dictionary quarter day, n.
  1. ^ Dagnall, H. (1991). Give us back our eleven days. Edgware: author. p. 19. ISBN 0-9515497-2-3.
  2. ^ a b Text of the Calendar (New Style) Act 1750 as in force today (including any amendments) within the United Kingdom, from legislation.gov.uk
  3. ^ 24 Geo. II Ch. 23, § 3.
  4. ^ 24 Geo. II Ch. 23, Annexe.
  5. ^ Bond 1875, See footnote on pages xvii–xviii: original text of the Scottish decree.
  6. ^ Parliament of Ireland 1750.
  7. ^ a b c Poole 1995; Steel 2000, p. 249
  8. ^ HMRC 2008.
  9. ^ Philip 1921, p. 24.
  10. ^ Legislation.gov.uk 2017.
  11. ^ Poole 1995, note 77.
  12. ^ Webster's Dictionary 1913.
  13. ^ Frecknall-Hughes 2016.
  14. ^ Blair 2013.
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