Wikipedia:Today's featured article

Today's featured article

This star symbolizes the featured content on Wikipedia.

At the top of the Main Page, a summarized lead section from one of Wikipedia's featured articles is displayed as "Today's featured article" (TFA). The current month's queue can be found here. TFAs are scheduled by the TFA coordinators, Dank (Dan), Jimfbleak, and Mike Christie. Community discussion of suggestions takes place at the TFA requests page.

If you notice an error in a future TFA summary, you're welcome to fix it yourself, but if the mistake is in today's or tomorrow's summary, you can leave a message at WP:ERRORS to ask an administrator to fix it. The summaries are formatted as a single paragraph of around 1,150 characters (including spaces), with no reference tags or alternative names. Only the link to the specified featured article is bolded, and this must be the first link. The summary should be preceded by an appropriate image when available; fair use images are not allowed.

The editnotice template for Today's Featured Article is {{ TFA-editnotice}}. It is automatically applied by {{ Editnotices/Namespace/Main}} when the article's title matches the contents of {{ TFA title}}. To contact the TFA coordinators, please leave a message on the TFA talk page, or type "{{ @TFA}}" in a signed comment on any talk page.

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Today's featured article

U.S. Route 113 sign

U.S. Route 113 (US 113) extends 75 miles (121 km) from US 13 in Pocomoke City, Maryland, north to Delaware Route 1 in Milford. The highway, which until 2003 reconnected with US 13 in Dover, Delaware, serves the Maryland towns of Snow Hill and Berlin and the Delaware towns of Selbyville, Millsboro, and Georgetown. It follows the corridor of a post road established in the late 18th century. The route was improved as an all-weather road in the 1910s. The Delaware portion of the route, including the former designation from Milford to Dover, was built by Thomas Coleman DuPont's company as the DuPont Highway, the first sections of which were completed on May 24, 1917. DuPont foresaw that traffic on highways would approach the speed and volume of railroads, so he designed the highway with a wide right of way and curves and grades adequate for high speed traffic. The DuPont Highway was one of the earliest roads built with bypasses, roads that passed close to towns but not directly through them. US 113 was widened and reconstructed in the 1930s and 1940s, including a bypass of Dover. The route was expanded to a divided highway starting in the 1950s. ( Full article...)

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NNC-US-1858-1C-Flying Eagle Cent.jpg

The Flying Eagle cent is a one-cent piece that was struck by the Mint of the United States as a pattern coin in 1856, and released for circulation on May 25, 1857. The coin was designed by Mint Chief Engraver James B. Longacre, with the eagle in flight based on the work of Longacre's predecessor, Christian Gobrecht. By the early 1850s, the large cent in circulation (about the size of a half dollar) was becoming both unpopular in commerce and expensive to coin. After experimenting with various sizes and compositions, the Mint decided on an alloy of 88% copper and 12% nickel for a new, smaller cent. After the Mint produced patterns with an 1856 date and gave them to legislators and officials, Congress formally authorized the new piece in February 1857. It was issued in exchange for the worn Spanish colonial silver coin that had circulated in the U.S. until then, as well as for its larger predecessor. So many cents were issued that they choked commercial channels, especially as they were not legal tender and no one had to take them. The eagle design did not strike well, and was replaced in 1859 by Longacre's Indian Head cent. ( Full article...)

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