University of Nottingham

University of Nottingham
University of Nottingham coat of arms.png
Coat of Arms of the University of Nottingham
Motto Sapientia urbs conditur ( Latin)
Motto in English
"A city is built on wisdom"
Type Public
Established 1798 as teacher training college, 1881 as University College Nottingham, 1948 university status awarded
Endowment £49.9 million (as of 31 July 2016) [1]
Budget £628.6 million (2015-16) [1]
Chancellor Sir Andrew Witty [2]
Vice-Chancellor Sir David Greenaway [3]
Visitor The Lord President of the Council ex officio [4]
Students 32,125 domestic (2015/16) [5]
43,893 worldwide [6]
Undergraduates 23,935 domestic (2015/16) [5]
Postgraduates 8,185 domestic (2015/16) [5]
Location Nottingham, England, UK
52°56′20″N 1°11′49″W / 52°56′20″N 1°11′49″W / 52.939; -1.197
Colours Blue and white                    
Affiliations ACU
Association of MBAs
EQUIS
EUA
Russell Group
Sutton 30
Universitas 21
Universities UK
Virgo Consortium
M5 Universities
Website nottingham.ac.uk
University of Nottingham logo.svg

The University of Nottingham is a public research university in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England, United Kingdom. It was founded as University College Nottingham in 1881, and was granted a Royal Charter in 1948.

Nottingham's main campus ( University Park) and teaching hospital ( Queen's Medical Centre) are on the outskirts of the City of Nottingham, with a number of smaller campuses and sites elsewhere in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire. Outside the United Kingdom, the university has campuses in Semenyih, Malaysia and Ningbo, China. Nottingham is organised into five constituent faculties, within which there are more than 50 schools, departments, institutes and research centres. Nottingham has about 44,000 students and 9,000 staff, and had an income of £635 million in 2015/16, of which £124.6 million was from research grants and contracts. [1]

The 2017 High Fliers survey stated Nottingham was the seventh most targeted university by the UK's top employers between 2016-17. [7] In 2012, Nottingham was ranked 13th in the world in terms of the number of alumni listed among CEOs of the Fortune Global 500. [8] It is also ranked 2nd (joint with Oxford) in the 2012 Summer Olympics table of British medal winners. [9] Moreover, in 2015, Nottingham was listed as the 9th largest European producer of entrepreneurs, according to a private report. [10] In the 2011 and 2014 GreenMetric World University Rankings, University Park was ranked as the world's most sustainable campus. [11] [12] The institution's alumni have been awarded a variety of prestigious accolades, including 3 Nobel Prizes, a Turner Prize, and a Gabor Medal and Prize.

The university is a member of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the Virgo Consortium, the European University Association, the Russell Group, Universities UK, Universitas 21, and participates in the Sutton Trust Summer School programme, as a member of the Sutton 30.

History

Founding

Photograph of the University College Nottingham (Arkwright Building), from the Illustrated Guide to the Church Congress 1897
University College Nottingham in 1897; the building is now known as the Arkwright Building, and is part of Nottingham Trent University

The University of Nottingham traces its origins to the founding of an adult education school in 1798, and the University Extension Lectures inaugurated by the University of Cambridge in 1873—the first of their kind in the country. [13] However, the foundation of the university is generally regarded as being the establishment of University College Nottingham, in 1881 as a college preparing students for examinations of the University of London.

In 1875, an anonymous donor provided £10,000 to establish the work of the Adult Education School and Cambridge Extension Lectures on a permanent basis, and the Corporation of Nottingham agreed to erect and maintain a building for this purpose and to provide funds to supply the instruction. [13]

The foundation stone of the college was duly laid in 1877 by the former Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone, [14] and the college's neo-gothic building on Shakespeare Street was formally opened in 1881 by Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany. [14] In 1881, there were four professors – of Literature, Physics, Chemistry and Natural Science. New departments and chairs quickly followed: Engineering in 1884, Classics combined with Philosophy in 1893, French in 1897 and Education in 1905; in 1905 the combined Department of Physics and Mathematics became two separate entities; in 1911 Departments of English and Mining were created, in 1912, Economics, and Geology combined with Geography; History in 1914, Adult Education in 1923 and Pharmacy in 1925. [13]

Development

Photograph of a class of ex-servicemen training to be teachers at Goldsmiths College, 1944
Art students from Goldsmith's College at University College Nottingham in 1944

The university college underwent significant expansion in the 1920s, when it moved from the centre of Nottingham to a large campus on the city's outskirts. The new campus, called University Park, was completed in 1928, and financed by an endowment fund, public contributions, and the generosity of Sir Jesse Boot (later Lord Trent) who presented 35 acres (14 ha) to the City of Nottingham in 1921. [15] Boot and his fellow benefactors sought to establish an "elite seat of learning" committed to widening participation, [16] and hoped that the move would solve the problems facing University College Nottingham, in its restricted building on Shakespeare Street. Boot stipulated that, whilst part of the Highfields site, lying south-west of the city, should be devoted to the University College, the rest should provide a place of recreation for the residents of the city, and, by the end of the decade, the landscaping of the lake and public park adjoining University Boulevard was completed. The original University College building on Shakespeare Street in central Nottingham, known as the Arkwright Building, now forms part of Nottingham Trent University's City Campus. [17]

D. H. Lawrence commented on the endowment and the architecture in the words

In Nottingham, that dismal town where I went to school and college,
they've built a new university for a new dispensation of knowledge.
Built it most grand and cakeily out of the noble loot
derived from shrewd cash-chemistry by good Sir Jesse Boot. [18]

Photograph of the University of Nottingham's Trent Building on University Park, in the January 2013 snow
Trent Building – Originally housed the entire university when it moved to University Park in 1928
Jubilee Campus in 2012. On the left is the Sir Harry and Lady Djanogly Learning Resource Centre, a library which has the form of an inverted cone.

University College Nottingham was initially accommodated within the Trent Building, an imposing white limestone structure with a distinctive clock tower, designed by Morley Horder, and formally opened by King George V on 10 July 1928. During this period of development, Nottingham attracted high-profile lecturers, including Albert Einstein, H. G. Wells, and Mahatma Gandhi. [19] The blackboard used by Einstein during his time at Nottingham is still on display in the Physics department. [20]

Apart from its physical transfer to surroundings that could not be more different from its original home,[ tone] the College made few developments between the wars. The Department of Slavonic Languages (later Slavonic Studies) was established in 1933, the teaching of Russian having been introduced in 1916. In 1933–34, the Departments of Electrical Engineering, Zoology and Geography, which had been combined with other subjects, were made independent; and in 1938 a supplemental Charter provided for a much wider representation on the Governing Body. However, further advances were delayed by the outbreak of war in 1939. [13]

University status

University College Nottingham students received their degrees from the University of London. [21] However, in 1948, the University was granted its Royal Charter, which endowed it with university status and gave it the power to confer degrees in its own name as The University of Nottingham. [22]

In the 1940s, the Midlands Agricultural and Dairy College at Sutton Bonington merged with the university as the School of Agriculture, and in 1956 the Portland Building was completed to complement the Trent Building. In 1970, the university established the UK's first new medical school of the 20th century. [14]

In 1999, Jubilee Campus was opened on the former site of the Raleigh Bicycle Company, one mile (1.6 km) away from the University Park Campus. Nottingham then began to expand overseas, opening campuses in Malaysia and in China in 1999 and 2004 respectively. In 2005, the King's Meadow Campus opened near University Park.

The logo the university used until 2001.

The university has used several logos throughout its history, beginning with its coat of arms. Later, Nottingham adopted a simpler logo, in which a stylised version of Nottingham Castle was surrounded by the text "The University of Nottingham". In 2001 Nottingham undertook a major re-branding exercise, which included replacing the logo with the current one.

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