Superpower

  • president ronald reagan and general secretary mikhail gorbachev, the leaders of the cold war's rival superpowers, meeting in geneva, switzerland in november 1985

    a superpower is a state with a dominant position characterized by its extensive ability to exert influence or project power on a global scale. this is done through the combined-means of economic, military, technological and cultural strength as well as diplomatic and soft power influence. traditionally, superpowers are preeminent among the great powers.

    the term was first applied post world war ii to the united states and the soviet union. for the duration of the cold war, the united states and the soviet union dominated world affairs. at the end of the cold war and the dissolution of the soviet union in 1991, only the united states appeared to be a superpower.[1][2][3] alice lyman miller defines a superpower as "a country that has the capacity to project dominating power and influence anywhere in the world, and sometimes, in more than one region of the globe at a time, and so may plausibly attain the status of global hegemony".[4] few countries have the potential to become superpowers; china is now considered an economic superpower, but it has been argued it presently lacks several factors including military and soft power to be widely recognized as a global superpower.[5][6]

  • terminology and origin
  • cold war
  • post–cold war era
  • see also
  • references
  • bibliography
  • external links

President Ronald Reagan and General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev, the leaders of the Cold War's rival superpowers, meeting in Geneva, Switzerland in November 1985

A superpower is a state with a dominant position characterized by its extensive ability to exert influence or project power on a global scale. This is done through the combined-means of economic, military, technological and cultural strength as well as diplomatic and soft power influence. Traditionally, superpowers are preeminent among the great powers.

The term was first applied post World War II to the United States and the Soviet Union. For the duration of the Cold War, the United States and the Soviet Union dominated world affairs. At the end of the Cold War and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, only the United States appeared to be a superpower.[1][2][3] Alice Lyman Miller defines a superpower as "a country that has the capacity to project dominating power and influence anywhere in the world, and sometimes, in more than one region of the globe at a time, and so may plausibly attain the status of global hegemony".[4] Few countries have the potential to become superpowers; China is now considered an economic superpower, but it has been argued it presently lacks several factors including military and soft power to be widely recognized as a global superpower.[5][6]

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Supermoondheid
العربية: القوى العظمى
azərbaycanca: Fövqəldövlət
беларуская: Звышдзяржава
čeština: Supervelmoc
chiShona: Mhitsa dzehondo
Cymraeg: Uwchbwer
dansk: Supermagt
Deutsch: Supermacht
Ελληνικά: Υπερδύναμη
Esperanto: Superpotenco
فارسی: ابرقدرت
français: Superpuissance
한국어: 초강대국
हिन्दी: परमशक्ति
Bahasa Indonesia: Adikuasa
italiano: Superpotenza
עברית: מעצמת-על
kurdî: Kelehêz
lietuvių: Supervalstybė
മലയാളം: വൻശക്തി
Bahasa Melayu: Adikuasa
日本語: 超大国
norsk: Supermakt
norsk nynorsk: Supermakt
português: Superpotência
română: Superputere
русский: Сверхдержава
Scots: Superpouer
Simple English: Superpower
slovenščina: Velesila
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Supersila
suomi: Supervalta
svenska: Supermakt
தமிழ்: வல்லரசு
тоҷикӣ: Абарқудрат
Türkçe: Süper güç
українська: Наддержава
Tiếng Việt: Siêu cường quốc
吴语: 超级大国
粵語: 超級大國
中文: 超级大国