St John's, Woking

St John's
  • St John's and Hook Heath
St John, Woking - geograph.org.uk - 1524106.jpg
St John's Church, St John's
St Johns Lye (geograph 1859486).jpg
Thick woodland is mixed with open meadow at St John's Lye, between St John's and Hook Heath
St Johns and Hook Heath occupies much of the mid-western suburban or urbanised three-quarters of the borough, north of the South Western Main Line and between the A3 and M3 trunk road routes
St Johns and Hook Heath occupies much of the mid-western suburban or urbanised three-quarters of the borough, north of the South Western Main Line and between the A3 and M3 trunk road routes
St John's
St John's shown within Surrey
Area3.46 km2 (1.34 sq mi)
Population4,656 (2011 Census. Ward)[1]
• Density1,346/km2 (3,490/sq mi)
SU9855
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townWoking
Postcode districtGU21
Dialling code01483
PoliceSurrey
FireSurrey
AmbulanceSouth East Coast
EU ParliamentSouth East England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Surrey
51°18′40″N 0°35′38″W / 51°18′40″N 0°35′38″W / 51.311; -0.594

St John's and Hook Heath is a suburban ward in Surrey consisting of two settlements founded in the 19th century in the medieval parish of Woking. The two 'villages' have residents' associations and are centred 2.5 km WSW and SW of Woking's town centre in the northwest of the English county – by including such suburbs, Woking is the largest town in the county. The ward in 2011 contained 1,888 homes across its 3.46 square kilometres (1.34 sq mi).

St John's

History

The village is elongated along the south of the Basingstoke Canal (completed in 1794), providing boat navigation and a quieter alternative for pedestrians and cyclists to access to the town centre than its various suburban streets. St John's formed towards the end of Goldsworth Road leading from what was becoming gradually a town centre. It dates largely from the 19th century, when housing first began to be constructed to accommodate workers employed at the local brickworks.

The village gained its name from the Church of England St John the Baptist's church, built here in 1842 from designs prepared by Sir George Gilbert Scott.[2] The church houses a notable organ, described in the National Pipe Organ Register.[3]

A narrow majority of shops and homes exhibit late Victorian to Edwardian architecture, styles which have been promoted in new buildings in and around its conservation area.[4]

Amenities

Economic amenities

Today the village is home to a mixture of shops and businesses which include a pharmacy, a small supermarket, restaurants, and office premises.

Informal social and leisure amenities.

Wildlife is present on the canal and at St John's Lye – a public open space with a football ground, areas set aside for habitat, a rolling elevated landscape, and other outdoor leisure use.

Organised social and leisure groups

The sole church, mentioned in history, is an active religious group and the dedication of the building gives rise to the name of the settlement.

Scout, guides, a residents' association providing voluntary work, the Women's Institute, a floral art group and the 'Churchill Tennis Club' operate in St John's.[5]

Baroness Anelay of St Johns is a notable member of the Village Hall facilities provision group for St John's Memorial Hall which is in the centre of the village.[6]

Schools

The following primary schools are in St John's:

  • Hermitage School
  • Oaktree School
  • St Hugh of Lincoln Catholic Primary School
  • St John's Primary School
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