South Asia

South Asia
South Asia (orthographic projection).svg
Countries and Territories[1]
Population1,891,454,121 (2018)[2]
Population rank1st (World)[3]
GDP (Nominal)$3.32 trillion[4][5]
GDP (PPP)$11.64 trillion[4]
LanguagesPrimarily Indo-European and Dravidian, but also Austroasiatic and Sino-Tibetan languages, as well as some others
Time zonesUTC+04:30, UTC+05:00, UTC+5:30, UTC+5:45, UTC+06:00
Capital cities
Largest cities

South Asia or Southern Asia, is a term used to represent the southern region of the Asian continent, which comprises the sub-Himalayan SAARC countries and, for some authorities, adjoining countries to the west and east. Topographically, it is dominated by the Indian Plate, which rises above sea level as Nepal and northern parts of India situated south of the Himalayas and the Hindu Kush. South Asia is bounded on the south by the Indian Ocean and on land (clockwise, from west) by West Asia, Central Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia.

The current territories of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka form South Asia.[7] The South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) is an economic cooperation organisation in the region which was established in 1985 and includes all eight nations comprising South Asia.[8]

South Asia covers about 5.2 million km2 (2 million mi2), which is 11.71% of the Asian continent or 3.5% of the world's land surface area.[7] The population of South Asia is about 1.891 billion or about one fourth of the world's population, making it both the most populous and the most densely populated geographical region in the world.[3] Overall, it accounts for about 39.49% of Asia's population, over 24% of the world's population, and is home to a vast array of people.[9][10][11]

In 2010, South Asia had the world's largest population of Hindus, Jains and Sikhs. It also has the largest population of Muslims in the Asia-Pacific region,[12][13] as well as over 35 million Christians and 25 million Buddhists.[14]

Definitions

United Nations cartographic map of South Asia.[15] However, the United Nations does not endorse any definitions or area boundaries.[note 1]

The total area of South Asia and its geographical extent is not clear cut as systemic and foreign policy orientations of its constituents are quite asymmetrical.[16] Aside from the central region of South Asia, formerly part of the British Empire, there is a high degree of variation as to which other countries are included in South Asia.[17][18][19][20]

Modern definitions of South Asia are consistent in including Afghanistan, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan and Maldives as the constituent countries.[21][22][23][24][25][26] Myanmar is included by some scholars in South Asia, but in Southeast Asia by others.[18][27] Some do not include Afghanistan,[18] others question whether Afghanistan should be considered a part of South Asia or the Middle East.[28][29]

The current territories of Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan, which were the core of the British Empire from 1857 to 1947, form the central region of South Asia, in addition to Afghanistan,[21][22][23][24][25][26] which was a British protectorate until 1919, after the Afghans lost to the British in the Second Anglo-Afghan war. The mountain countries of Nepal and Bhutan, and the island countries of Sri Lanka and Maldives are generally included as well. Myanmar (formerly Burma) is often added, and by various deviating definitions based on often substantially different reasons, the British Indian Ocean Territory and the Tibet Autonomous Region are included as well.[16][30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37]

The common concept of South Asia is largely inherited from the administrative boundaries of the British Raj,[38] with several exceptions. The Aden Colony, British Somaliland and Singapore, though administered at various times under the Raj, have not been proposed as any part of South Asia.[39] Additionally Burma was administered as part of the Raj until 1937, but is now considered a part of Southeast Asia and is a member state of ASEAN. The 562 princely states that were protected by but not directly ruled by the Raj became administrative parts of South Asia upon joining Union of India or Dominion of Pakistan.[40][41][42] Geopolitically, it had formed the whole territory of Greater India,[27][43]

The South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC), a contiguous block of countries, started in 1985 with seven countries – Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka – and added Afghanistan as an eighth member in 2007.[44][45] China and Myanmar have also applied for the status of full members of SAARC.[46][47] This bloc of countries include two independent countries that were not part of the British Raj – Nepal, and Bhutan. Afghanistan was a British protectorate from 1878 until 1919, after the Afghans lost to the British in the Second Anglo-Afghan war. The World Factbook, based on geo-politics, people, and economy defines South Asia as comprising Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, British Indian Ocean Territory, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.[48] The South Asia Free Trade Agreement incorporated Afghanistan in 2011, and the World Bank grouping of countries in the region also includes all eight members comprising South Asia and SAARC as well,[49][50] and the same goes for the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF).[51][52]

Definition by South Asian Studies programs
When the Centre for South Asian Studies at the University of Cambridge was established, in 1964, it promoted the study of India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Afghanistan,[53][54][55][56] the Himalayan Kingdoms (Nepal, Bhutan, and Sikkim[57]), and Burma (now Myanmar). It has since included Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Indonesia, the Philippines and Hong Kong.[58]

The Centres for South Asian Studies at both the University of Michigan and the University of Virginia include Tibet along with the eight members of SAARC in their research programs, but exclude the Maldives.[59][60] The South Asian Studies Program of Rutgers University and the University of California, Berkeley Centre for South Asia Studies also include the Maldives.[61][62]

The South Asian Studies Program of Brandeis University defines the region as comprising "India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, and in certain contexts Afghanistan, Burma, Maldives and Tibet".[63] The similar program of Columbia University includes Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka in their study and excludes Burma.[64]

The United Nations Statistics Division's scheme of sub-regions include all eight members of the SAARC as part of Southern Asia, along with Iran[65] only for statistical purposes.[66] Population Information Network (POPIN) includes Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burma, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka as part of South Asia. Maldives, in view of its characteristics, was admitted as a member Pacific POPIN subregional network only in principle.[67] The Hirschman–Herfindahl index of the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific for the region includes only the original seven signatories of SAARC.[68]

The British Indian Ocean Territory is connected to the region by a publication of Jane's for security considerations.[69] The region may also include the disputed territory of Aksai Chin, which was part of the British Indian princely state of Jammu and Kashmir, but is now administered as part of the Chinese autonomous region of Xinjiang.[70]

The inclusion of Myanmar in South Asia is without consensus, with many considering it a part of Southeast Asia and others including it within South Asia.[18][27] Afghanistan was of importance to the British colonial empire, especially after the Second Anglo-Afghan War over 1878–1880. Afghanistan remained a British protectorate until 1919, when a treaty with Vladimir Lenin included the granting of independence to Afghanistan. Following India's partition, Afghanistan has generally been included in South Asia, with some considering it a part of Southwest Asia.[16] During the Soviet–Afghan War (1979–1989) American foreign policy considered Pakistan and Afghanistan in Southwest Asia, while others included it as a part of South Asia.[7] There is no universal agreement among scholars on which countries should be included within South Asia.[18]

In the past, a lack of a coherent definition for South Asia resulted in not only a lack of academic studies, but also in a lack interest for such studies.[71] The confusion existed also because of the lack of a clear boundary – geographically, geopolitical, socio-culturally, economically or historically – between South Asia and other parts of Asia, especially the Middle East and Southeast Asia.[72] Identification with a South Asian identity was also found to be significantly low among respondents in an older two-year survey across Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.[73] However, modern definitions of South Asia are very consistent in including Afghanistan, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan and Maldives as the constituent countries.[21][22][23][24][25][26]

Indian subcontinent

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the term "subcontinent" signifies a "subdivision of a continent which has a distinct geographical, political, or cultural identity" and also a "large land mass somewhat smaller than a continent".[74][75] Historians Catherine Asher and Cynthia Talbot state that the term "Indian subcontinent" describes a natural physical landmass in South Asia that has been relatively isolated from the rest of Eurasia.[76] The Indian subcontinent is also a geological term referring to the land mass that drifted northeastwards from ancient Gondwana, colliding with the Eurasian plate nearly 55 million years ago, towards the end of Palaeocene. This geological region largely includes Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.[77]

The use of the term Indian subcontinent began in the British Empire, and has been a term particularly common in its successors.[78] This region has also been labelled as "India" (in its classical and pre-modern sense), "Greater India", or as South Asia.[27][43]

According to anthropologist John R. Lukacs, "the Indian Subcontinent occupies the major landmass of South Asia",[79] while the political science professor Tatu Vanhanen states, "the seven countries of South Asia constitute geographically a compact region around the Indian Subcontinent".[80] According to Chris Brewster, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bhutan constitute the Indian subcontinent; with Afghanistan and Maldives included it is more commonly referred to as South Asia.[81] The geopolitical boundaries of Indian subcontinent, according to Dhavendra Kumar, include "India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan and other small islands of the Indian Ocean".[82] Maldives, the country consisting of a small archipelago southwest of the peninsula, is considered part of the Indian subcontinent.[83]

The terms "Indian subcontinent" and "South Asia" are sometimes used interchangeably.[30][78] The South Asia term is particularly common when scholars or officials seek to differentiate this region from East Asia.[84] According to historians Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal, the Indian subcontinent has come to be known as South Asia "in more recent and neutral parlance."[85] This "neutral" notion refers to the concerns of Pakistan and Bangladesh, particularly given the recurring conflicts between India and Pakistan, wherein the dominant placement of "India" as a prefix before the subcontinent might offend some political sentiments.[27]

There is no globally accepted definition on which countries are a part of South Asia or Indian subcontinent.[18][19][20] While Afghanistan is not considered as a part of the Indian subcontinent, Afghanistan is often included in South Asia.[20] Similarly, Myanmar is included by some scholars in South Asia but not in Indian subcontinent.[27]

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Suid-Asië
አማርኛ: ደቡብ እስያ
العربية: جنوب آسيا
asturianu: Asia del Sur
Avañe'ẽ: Ñemby Asia
azərbaycanca: Cənubi Asiya
تۆرکجه: گونئی آسیا
Bân-lâm-gú: Lâm-a
беларуская: Паўднёвая Азія
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Паўднёвая Азія
भोजपुरी: दक्खिन एशिया
български: Южна Азия
Boarisch: Sidasien
bosanski: Južna Azija
brezhoneg: Azia ar Su
Чӑвашла: Кăнтăр Ази
čeština: Jižní Asie
Cymraeg: De Asia
dansk: Sydasien
Deutsch: Südasien
ދިވެހިބަސް: ދެކުނު އޭޝިޔާ
español: Asia del Sur
Esperanto: Suda Azio
Fiji Hindi: South Asia
français: Asie du Sud
Frysk: Súd-Aazje
ગુજરાતી: દક્ષિણ એશિયા
한국어: 남아시아
hrvatski: Južna Azija
Bahasa Indonesia: Asia Selatan
íslenska: Suður-Asía
עברית: דרום אסיה
Basa Jawa: Asia Kidul
Kapampangan: Mauling Asia
kernowek: Asi Soth
Kiswahili: Asia ya Kusini
Кыргызча: Түштүк Азия
latviešu: Dienvidāzija
lietuvių: Pietų Azija
lingála: Azía ya Sidi
Lingua Franca Nova: Asia sude
magyar: Dél-Ázsia
македонски: Јужна Азија
മലയാളം: ദക്ഷിണേഷ്യ
მარგალური: ობჟათე აზია
Bahasa Melayu: Asia Selatan
Mìng-dĕ̤ng-ngṳ̄: Nàng-ā
монгол: Өмнө Ази
Nederlands: Zuid-Azië
नेपाल भाषा: दक्षिण एसिया
日本語: 南アジア
нохчийн: Къилба Ази
Nordfriisk: Süüdaasien
norsk: Sør-Asia
norsk nynorsk: Sør-Asia
occitan: Asia del Sud
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Janubiy Osiyo
ភាសាខ្មែរ: អាស៊ីខាងត្បូង
português: Ásia Meridional
Qaraqalpaqsha: Qubla Aziya
română: Asia de Sud
русский: Южная Азия
саха тыла: Соҕуруу Азия
Scots: Sooth Asie
Simple English: South Asia
slovenčina: Južná Ázia
slovenščina: Južna Azija
српски / srpski: Јужна Азија
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Južna Azija
Basa Sunda: Asia Kidul
svenska: Sydasien
Tagalog: Timog Asya
татарча/tatarça: Көньяк Азия
Türkçe: Güney Asya
Türkmençe: Günorta Aziýa
українська: Південна Азія
Tiếng Việt: Nam Á
文言: 南亞
West-Vlams: Zuud-Azië
吴语: 南亞
ייִדיש: דרום אזיע
粵語: 南亞
Zazaki: Asyay Veroci
中文: 南亚