Royal Hong Kong Regiment

  • royal hong kong regiment (the volunteers)
    active1854–1995
    country british hong kong
    branch british army
    typelocal auxiliary militia
    garrison/hqhong kong garrison
    motto(s)nulli secundus in oriente (second to none in the east)
    colours    red,     yellow,     blue
    anniversaries1854, 1971, 1995
    engagementsbattle of hong kong
    royal hong kong regiment
    traditional chinese皇家香港軍團(義勇軍)

    the royal hong kong regiment (the volunteers) (rhkr(v)) (chinese: 皇家香港軍團(義勇軍)), formed in may 1854, was a local auxiliary militia force funded and administered by the colonial government of hong kong.

    during the imperial age, home defence units were raised in various british colonies with the intention of allowing regular army units tied up on garrison duty to be deployed elsewhere. these units were generally organised along british army lines. the first locally raised militia in hong kong was the hong kong volunteers, a fore runner of what was to become the royal hong kong regiment (the volunteers).

    although the british government, as national government, was responsible for the defence of the territories and colonies, and held direct control of military units raised within them, the local forces were raised and funded by the local governments or the territories and as such the rhkr(v) was always a branch of the hong kong government. it was not a part of the reserve force of the british army. the rhkr(v) did however form part of the order of battle of 48 gurkha infantry brigade and were under command of the commander of the british forces in hong kong.

    these locally raised defence units met british military standards in organisation and efficiency. many of the officers and ncos attended training in the uk. although colonial/overseas british territories' auxiliary units could have no tasking under the british ministry of defence, and members could not be compelled to serve outside their territory, many served voluntarily on attachment to british regular and territorial army units.

    the regiment should not be confused with the separate hong kong regiment formed in 1892, which was a regular infantry regiment of the british army, recruited in india.

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Royal Hong Kong Regiment (The Volunteers)
Active1854–1995
Country British Hong Kong
Branch British Army
Typelocal auxiliary militia
Garrison/HQHong Kong Garrison
Motto(s)Nulli Secundus in Oriente (Second to None in the East)
Colours    red,     yellow,     blue
Anniversaries1854, 1971, 1995
EngagementsBattle of Hong Kong
Royal Hong Kong Regiment
Traditional Chinese皇家香港軍團(義勇軍)

The Royal Hong Kong Regiment (The Volunteers) (RHKR(V)) (Chinese: 皇家香港軍團(義勇軍)), formed in May 1854, was a local auxiliary militia force funded and administered by the colonial Government of Hong Kong.

During the imperial age, home defence units were raised in various British colonies with the intention of allowing regular army units tied up on garrison duty to be deployed elsewhere. These units were generally organised along British Army lines. The first locally raised militia in Hong Kong was the Hong Kong Volunteers, a fore runner of what was to become the Royal Hong Kong Regiment (The Volunteers).

Although the British government, as national government, was responsible for the defence of the territories and colonies, and held direct control of military units raised within them, the local forces were raised and funded by the local governments or the territories and as such the RHKR(V) was always a branch of the Hong Kong government. It was not a part of the reserve force of the British Army. The RHKR(V) did however form part of the order of battle of 48 Gurkha Infantry Brigade and were under command of the commander of the British forces in Hong Kong.

These locally raised defence units met British military standards in organisation and efficiency. Many of the officers and NCOs attended training in the UK. Although colonial/overseas British territories' auxiliary units could have no tasking under the British Ministry of Defence, and members could not be compelled to serve outside their territory, many served voluntarily on attachment to British Regular and Territorial Army units.

The regiment should not be confused with the separate Hong Kong Regiment formed in 1892, which was a regular infantry regiment of the British Army, recruited in India.

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