Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville, 3rd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos

His Grace
The Duke of Buckingham
and Chandos

GCSI PC DL
3rd duke governor madras.jpg
The Duke at the time of his appointment as Governor of Madras in 1885
Governor of Madras Presidency
In office
23 November 1875 – 20 December 1880
Governor-GeneralThomas Baring, 1st Earl of Northbrook,
Robert Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Earl of Lytton,
George Robinson, 1st Marquess of Ripon
Preceded byWilliam Rose Robinson (acting)
Succeeded byWilliam Patrick Adam
Lord President of the Council
In office
6 July 1866 – 8 March 1867
MonarchVictoria
Prime MinisterThe Earl of Derby
Preceded byThe Earl Granville
Succeeded byThe Duke of Marlborough
Secretary of State for the Colonies
In office
8 March 1867 – 1 December 1868
MonarchVictoria
Prime MinisterThe Earl of Derby
Benjamin Disraeli
Preceded byThe Earl of Carnarvon
Succeeded byThe Earl Granville
Personal details
Born10 September 1823 (1823-09-10)
Died26 March 1889 (1889-03-27) (aged 65)
Chandos House, Marylebone, London
NationalityBritish
Political partyConservative
Spouse(s)(1) Caroline Harvey
(d. 1874)
(2) Alice Graham-Montgomery
(1847–1931)
Children3, including Mary Morgan-Grenville, 11th Lady Kinloss
ParentsRichard Temple-Grenville, 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos
Lady Mary Campbell
Alma materChrist Church, Oxford

Richard Plantagenet Campbell Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville, 3rd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos GCSI PC DL (10 September 1823 – 26 March 1889), styled Earl Temple until 1839 and Marquess of Chandos from 1839 to 1861, was a British soldier, politician and administrator of the 19th century. He was a close friend and subordinate of Benjamin Disraeli and served as the Secretary of State for the Colonies from 1867 to 1868 and Governor of Madras from 1875 to 1880.

Buckingham was the only son of Richard Temple-Grenville, 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, and was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford. He joined the British Army, eventually rising to become a colonel. Buckingham entered politics, as Lord Chandos, in 1846 when he was elected unopposed from Buckinghamshire as a candidate of the Conservative Party. Buckingham served as Member of Parliament from 1846 to 1857, when he resigned. He contested a re-election in 1859, but lost. Buckingham served in various political offices during his tenure. In March 1867, he was appointed Secretary of State for the Colonies and served until December 1868. He also served as Governor of Madras from 1875 to 1880. As Governor, he handled the relief measures for the victims of the Great Famine of 1876-78. Buckingham also served as Lord of the Treasury, Keeper of the Privy Seal of the Prince of Wales, Deputy Warden of the Stannaries, Deputy Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire, Chairman of the London and North-Western Railway, member of the Imperial Privy Council, Lord President of the Council and chairman of the committees in the House of Lords. He died on 26 March 1889 at the age of 65.

Background and education

Buckingham was the only son of Richard, 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, and his wife Lady Mary, younger daughter of John Campbell, 4th Earl of Breadalbane and Holland (later The 1st Marquess of Breadalbane). His sister was Lady Anna Eliza Mary Gore-Langton and she was a women's rights campaigner.[1] As his father's son and heir apparent, he was styled Earl Temple from birth. He was 15 years of age when his paternal grandfather died and his father became the 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos. From this time, he was styled Marquess of Chandos until he succeeded his father as Duke.

The young Lord Temple, later Lord Chandos, attended Eton until 1841 and graduated from Christ Church, Oxford. Two years after graduation, Lord Chandos (as he then was) was commissioned a Lieutenant in the Royal Buckinghamshire Yeomanry and he would eventually become Honorary Colonel of that regiment. He was also Hon Colonel of the 1st Administrative Battalion, Middlesex Artillery Volunteers and later of the City of London Artillery.[2]