Polio vaccine

  • polio vaccine
    poliodrops.jpg
    vaccine description
    target diseasepoliomyelitis
    typeopv: attenuated; ipv: killed
    clinical data
    trade namesipol, poliovax, others
    ahfs/monograph
    a601177
    license data
    • us ipol
    pregnancy
    category
    • au: b2 [1]
    • us: n (not classified yet) [1]
    routes of
    administration
    parenteral (ipv), by mouth (opv)
    atc code
    • who) who) who) who)
    legal status
    legal status
    • us: ℞-only
    identifiers
    chemspider
    • none
     ☒n☑y (verify)

    polio vaccines are vaccines used to prevent poliomyelitis (polio).[2] two types are used: an inactivated poliovirus given by injection (ipv) and a weakened poliovirus given by mouth (opv).[2] the world health organization (who) recommends all children be fully vaccinated against polio.[2] the two vaccines have eliminated polio from most of the world,[3][4] and reduced the number of cases reported each year from an estimated 350,000 in 1988 to 33 in 2018.[5][6]

    the inactivated polio vaccines are very safe.[2] mild redness or pain may occur at the site of injection.[2] oral polio vaccines cause about three cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis per million doses given.[2] this compares with 5,000 cases per million who are paralysed following a polio infection.[7] both are generally safe to give during pregnancy and in those who have hiv/aids but are otherwise well.[2]

    the first successful demonstration of a polio vaccine was by hilary koprowski in 1950, with a live attenuated virus which people drank.[8] this vaccine, however, was not approved in the united states.[8] an inactivated polio vaccine, developed a few years later by jonas salk, came into use in 1955.[2][9] another oral polio vaccine was developed by albert sabin and came into commercial use in 1961.[2][10] it is on the world health organization's list of essential medicines, the safest and most effective medicines needed in a health system.[11] the wholesale cost in the developing world is about us$0.25 per dose for the oral form as of 2014.[12] in the united states, it costs between $25 and $50 for the inactivated form.[13]

  • medical uses
  • side effects
  • manufacture
  • history
  • society and culture
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Polio vaccine
Poliodrops.jpg
Vaccine description
Target diseasePoliomyelitis
TypeOPV: Attenuated; IPV: Killed
Clinical data
Trade namesIpol, Poliovax, others
AHFS/Monograph
a601177
License data
Pregnancy
category
Routes of
administration
Parenteral (IPV), By mouth (OPV)
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
ChemSpider
  • none
 ☒N☑Y (verify)

Polio vaccines are vaccines used to prevent poliomyelitis (polio).[2] Two types are used: an inactivated poliovirus given by injection (IPV) and a weakened poliovirus given by mouth (OPV).[2] The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends all children be fully vaccinated against polio.[2] The two vaccines have eliminated polio from most of the world,[3][4] and reduced the number of cases reported each year from an estimated 350,000 in 1988 to 33 in 2018.[5][6]

The inactivated polio vaccines are very safe.[2] Mild redness or pain may occur at the site of injection.[2] Oral polio vaccines cause about three cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis per million doses given.[2] This compares with 5,000 cases per million who are paralysed following a polio infection.[7] Both are generally safe to give during pregnancy and in those who have HIV/AIDS but are otherwise well.[2]

The first successful demonstration of a polio vaccine was by Hilary Koprowski in 1950, with a live attenuated virus which people drank.[8] This vaccine, however, was not approved in the United States.[8] An inactivated polio vaccine, developed a few years later by Jonas Salk, came into use in 1955.[2][9] Another oral polio vaccine was developed by Albert Sabin and came into commercial use in 1961.[2][10] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the safest and most effective medicines needed in a health system.[11] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$0.25 per dose for the oral form as of 2014.[12] In the United States, it costs between $25 and $50 for the inactivated form.[13]

Other Languages
Bahasa Indonesia: Vaksin polio
македонски: Полио вакцина
Bahasa Melayu: Vaksin polio
Simple English: Polio vaccine
svenska: Poliovaccin
Tiếng Việt: Vắc-xin bại liệt