Philippine English

  • philippine english
    native tophilippines
    regionsoutheast asia
    native speakers
    ~28,700 l1 speakers (2005 unsd)
    ~40 million l2 speakers (crystal 2003a)[1]
    language family
    indo-european
    • germanic
      • west germanic
        • anglo–frisian
          • anglic
            • english
              • american english
                • philippine english
    language codes
    iso 639-3
    glottolognone
    this article contains ipa phonetic symbols. without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of unicode characters. for an introductory guide on ipa symbols, see help:ipa.

    philippine english (similar and related to american english) is any variety of english native to the philippines, including those used by the media and the vast majority of educated filipinos. english is taught in schools as one of the two official languages of the country, the other being filipino (tagalog). due to the highly multilingual nature of the philippines, code-switching such as taglish (tagalog-infused english) and bislish (english infused with any of the visayan languages) is prevalent across domains from casual settings to formal situations.[2][3][4][5][6][7]

  • history
  • orthography and grammar
  • vocabulary
  • phonology
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Philippine English
Native toPhilippines
RegionSoutheast Asia
Native speakers
~28,700 L1 speakers (2005 UNSD)
~40 million L2 speakers (Crystal 2003a)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3
GlottologNone
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

Philippine English (similar and related to American English) is any variety of English native to the Philippines, including those used by the media and the vast majority of educated Filipinos. English is taught in schools as one of the two official languages of the country, the other being Filipino (Tagalog). Due to the highly multilingual nature of the Philippines, code-switching such as Taglish (Tagalog-infused English) and Bislish (English infused with any of the Visayan languages) is prevalent across domains from casual settings to formal situations.[2][3][4][5][6][7]

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