Paleontology

  • a paleontologist at work at john day fossil beds national monument

    paleontology, also spelled palaeontology or palæontology (ən-/), is the scientific study of life that existed prior to, and sometimes including, the start of the holocene epoch (roughly 11,700 years before present). it includes the study of fossils to classify organisms and study interactions with each other and their environments (their paleoecology). paleontological observations have been documented as far back as the 5th century bce. the science became established in the 18th century as a result of georges cuvier's work on comparative anatomy, and developed rapidly in the 19th century. the term itself originates from greek παλαιός, palaios, "old, ancient", ὄν, on (gen. ontos), "being, creature" and λόγος, logos, "speech, thought, study".[1]

    paleontology lies on the border between biology and geology, but differs from archaeology in that it excludes the study of anatomically modern humans. it now uses techniques drawn from a wide range of sciences, including biochemistry, mathematics, and engineering. use of all these techniques has enabled paleontologists to discover much of the evolutionary history of life, almost all the way back to when earth became capable of supporting life, about 3.8 billion years ago. as knowledge has increased, paleontology has developed specialised sub-divisions, some of which focus on different types of fossil organisms while others study ecology and environmental history, such as ancient climates.

    body fossils and trace fossils are the principal types of evidence about ancient life, and geochemical evidence has helped to decipher the evolution of life before there were organisms large enough to leave body fossils. estimating the dates of these remains is essential but difficult: sometimes adjacent rock layers allow radiometric dating, which provides absolute dates that are accurate to within 0.5%, but more often paleontologists have to rely on relative dating by solving the "jigsaw puzzles" of biostratigraphy (arrangement of rock layers from youngest to oldest). classifying ancient organisms is also difficult, as many do not fit well into the linnaean taxonomy classifying living organisms, and paleontologists more often use cladistics to draw up evolutionary "family trees". the final quarter of the 20th century saw the development of molecular phylogenetics, which investigates how closely organisms are related by measuring the similarity of the dna in their genomes. molecular phylogenetics has also been used to estimate the dates when species diverged, but there is controversy about the reliability of the molecular clock on which such estimates depend.

  • overview
  • sources of evidence
  • classifying ancient organisms
  • estimating the dates of organisms
  • history of life
  • history
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

A paleontologist at work at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Paleontology, also spelled palaeontology or palæontology (ən-/), is the scientific study of life that existed prior to, and sometimes including, the start of the Holocene Epoch (roughly 11,700 years before present). It includes the study of fossils to classify organisms and study interactions with each other and their environments (their paleoecology). Paleontological observations have been documented as far back as the 5th century BCE. The science became established in the 18th century as a result of Georges Cuvier's work on comparative anatomy, and developed rapidly in the 19th century. The term itself originates from Greek παλαιός, palaios, "old, ancient", ὄν, on (gen. ontos), "being, creature" and λόγος, logos, "speech, thought, study".[1]

Paleontology lies on the border between biology and geology, but differs from archaeology in that it excludes the study of anatomically modern humans. It now uses techniques drawn from a wide range of sciences, including biochemistry, mathematics, and engineering. Use of all these techniques has enabled paleontologists to discover much of the evolutionary history of life, almost all the way back to when Earth became capable of supporting life, about 3.8 billion years ago. As knowledge has increased, paleontology has developed specialised sub-divisions, some of which focus on different types of fossil organisms while others study ecology and environmental history, such as ancient climates.

Body fossils and trace fossils are the principal types of evidence about ancient life, and geochemical evidence has helped to decipher the evolution of life before there were organisms large enough to leave body fossils. Estimating the dates of these remains is essential but difficult: sometimes adjacent rock layers allow radiometric dating, which provides absolute dates that are accurate to within 0.5%, but more often paleontologists have to rely on relative dating by solving the "jigsaw puzzles" of biostratigraphy (arrangement of rock layers from youngest to oldest). Classifying ancient organisms is also difficult, as many do not fit well into the Linnaean taxonomy classifying living organisms, and paleontologists more often use cladistics to draw up evolutionary "family trees". The final quarter of the 20th century saw the development of molecular phylogenetics, which investigates how closely organisms are related by measuring the similarity of the DNA in their genomes. Molecular phylogenetics has also been used to estimate the dates when species diverged, but there is controversy about the reliability of the molecular clock on which such estimates depend.

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Paleontologie
asturianu: Paleontoloxía
azərbaycanca: Paleontologiya
Bân-lâm-gú: Kó͘-seng-bu̍t-ha̍k
башҡортса: Палеонтология
беларуская: Палеанталогія
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Палеанталёгія
български: Палеонтология
bosanski: Paleontologija
brezhoneg: Paleontologiezh
català: Paleontologia
čeština: Paleontologie
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한국어: 고생물학
hrvatski: Paleontologija
Bahasa Indonesia: Paleontologi
interlingua: Paleontologia
Interlingue: Paleontologie
italiano: Paleontologia
Kiswahili: Palantolojia
Кыргызча: Палеонтология
latviešu: Paleontoloģija
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Limburgs: Paleontologie
Lingua Franca Nova: Paleontolojia
magyar: Őslénytan
македонски: Палеонтологија
მარგალური: პალეონტოლოგია
Bahasa Melayu: Paleontologi
Minangkabau: Paleontologi
မြန်မာဘာသာ: နိခါတကဗေဒ
Nederlands: Paleontologie
日本語: 古生物学
norsk nynorsk: Paleontologi
occitan: Paleontologia
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Paleontologiya
Piemontèis: Paleontologìa
Plattdüütsch: Paläontologie
português: Paleontologia
română: Paleontologie
Simple English: Paleontology
slovenčina: Paleontológia
slovenščina: Paleontologija
српски / srpski: Палеонтологија
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Paleontologija
svenska: Paleontologi
Türkçe: Paleontoloji
українська: Палеонтологія
اردو: رکازیات
Tiếng Việt: Cổ sinh vật học
Volapük: Fösilav
吴语: 古生物学
粵語: 古生物學
中文: 古生物学