Pale Blue Dot

  • dark grey and black static with coloured vertical rays of sunlight over part of the image. a small pale blue point of light is barely visible.
    seen from about 6 billion kilometers (3.7 billion miles), earth appears as a tiny dot within deep space: the blueish-white speck almost halfway up the brown band on the right.

    pale blue dot is a photograph of planet earth taken on february 14, 1990, by the voyager 1 space probe from a record distance of about 6 billion kilometers (3.7 billion miles, 40.5 au), as part of that day's family portrait series of images of the solar system.

    in the photograph, earth's apparent size is less than a pixel; the planet appears as a tiny dot against the vastness of space, among bands of sunlight reflected by the camera.[1]

    voyager 1, which had completed its primary mission and was leaving the solar system, was commanded by nasa to turn its camera around and take one last photograph of earth across a great expanse of space, at the request of astronomer and author carl sagan.[2] the phrase "pale blue dot" was coined by sagan himself in his reflections on the photograph's significance, documented in his 1994 book of the same name.[1]

  • background
  • camera
  • photograph
  • pale blue color
  • distance
  • reflections
  • anniversaries
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Dark grey and black static with coloured vertical rays of sunlight over part of the image. A small pale blue point of light is barely visible.
Seen from about 6 billion kilometers (3.7 billion miles), Earth appears as a tiny dot within deep space: the blueish-white speck almost halfway up the brown band on the right.

Pale Blue Dot is a photograph of planet Earth taken on February 14, 1990, by the Voyager 1 space probe from a record distance of about 6 billion kilometers (3.7 billion miles, 40.5 AU), as part of that day's Family Portrait series of images of the Solar System.

In the photograph, Earth's apparent size is less than a pixel; the planet appears as a tiny dot against the vastness of space, among bands of sunlight reflected by the camera.[1]

Voyager 1, which had completed its primary mission and was leaving the Solar System, was commanded by NASA to turn its camera around and take one last photograph of Earth across a great expanse of space, at the request of astronomer and author Carl Sagan.[2] The phrase "Pale Blue Dot" was coined by Sagan himself in his reflections on the photograph's significance, documented in his 1994 book of the same name.[1]

Other Languages
azərbaycanca: Solğun Mavi Nöqtə
bosanski: Pale Blue Dot
Deutsch: Pale Blue Dot
Esperanto: Pala Blua Punkto
hrvatski: Pale Blue Dot
Bahasa Indonesia: Titik Biru Pucat
italiano: Pale Blue Dot
Bahasa Melayu: Titik Biru Pucat
မြန်မာဘာသာ: အပြာဖျော့အစက်
Nederlands: Pale Blue Dot
português: Pálido Ponto Azul
română: Un punct azuriu
русский: Pale Blue Dot
slovenščina: Bleda modra pika
српски / srpski: Бледа плава тачка
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Pale Blue Dot
Tiếng Việt: Đốm xanh mờ
中文: 暗淡藍點