Pacific lamprey

Pacific lamprey
Lampetra tridentata 1.jpeg
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Chordata
Class:Cephalaspidomorphi
Order:Petromyzontiformes
Family:Petromyzontidae
Genus:Entosphenus
Species:E. tridentatus
Binomial name
Entosphenus tridentatus
(Richardson, 1836)
Synonyms[1][2]
  • Petromyzon tridentatus Richardson 1836
  • Entosphenus tridentatus tridentatus (Richardson 1836)
  • Lampetra tridentata (Richardson 1836)
  • Petromyzon ciliatus Ayres 1855
  • Petromyzon lividus Girard 1858
  • Petromyzon astori Girard 1858
  • Entosphenus epihexodon Gill 1862
  • Petromyzon epihexodon (Gill 1862)
Entosphenus tridentatus at Bonneville Dam in Washington

The Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus or Lampetra tridentata) is an anadromous parasitic lamprey from the Pacific Coast of North America and Asia. It is a member of the Petromyzontidae family. The Pacific lamprey is also known as the three-tooth lamprey and tridentate lamprey.

Description

Pacific lamprey digging a nest (redd)
Pacific lampreys passing through the Bonneville Dam

Pacific lampreys grow to about 80 cm (31 in) as adults. They are anadromous and semelparous. They have slender, elongated bodies with two dorsal fins arising far back on the body. The anal fins are rudimentary and the lower lobe of the caudal fin is larger than the upper lobe and both lobes are continuous with the dorsal fin and the anal fin. Adults living in the sea are a bluish-black or greenish colour above and pale below, but those in fresh water are brown. This species is distinguished by having three (or occasionally two) sharp teeth on the supraoral bar above the mouth and three sharp points on each lateral plate.[3]