North American Free Trade Agreement

  • north american free trade agreement

    • tratado de libre comercio de américa del norte  (spanish)
    • accord de libre-échange nord-américain  (french)
    logo of the nafta secretariat of north american free trade agreement
    logo of the nafta secretariat
    location of north american free trade agreement
    languages
    • english
    • spanish
    • french
    typefree trade area
    member states
    • canada
    • mexico
    • united states
    establishmentjanuary 1, 1994; 26 years ago (1994-01-01)[1]
    area
    • total
    21,578,137 km2 (8,331,365 sq mi)
    • water (%)
    7.4
    population
    • 2018 estimate
    490,000,000
    • density
    22.3/km2 (57.8/sq mi)
    gdp (ppp)2018 estimate
    • total
    $24.8 trillion[2]
    • per capita
    $50,700
    website
    www.naftanow.org
    nafta gdp – 2012 : imf – world economic outlook databases (oct 2013)

    the north american free trade agreement (nafta; spanish: tratado de libre comercio de américa del norte, tlcan; french: accord de libre-échange nord-américain, alÉna) is an agreement signed by canada, mexico, and the united states, creating a trilateral trade bloc in north america. the agreement came into force on january 1, 1994, and superseded the 1988 canada–united states free trade agreement between the united states and canada. the nafta trade bloc is one of the largest trade blocs in the world by gross domestic product.

    the impetus for a north american free trade zone began with u.s. president ronald reagan, who made the idea part of his 1980 presidential campaign. after the signing of the canada–united states free trade agreement in 1988, the administrations of u.s. president george h. w. bush, mexican president carlos salinas de gortari, and canadian prime minister brian mulroney agreed to negotiate what became nafta. each submitted the agreement for ratification in their respective capitals in december 1992, but nafta faced significant opposition in both the united states and canada. all three countries ratified nafta in 1993 after the addition of two side agreements, the north american agreement on labor cooperation (naalc) and the north american agreement on environmental cooperation (naaec).

    passage of nafta resulted in the elimination or reduction of barriers to trade and investment between the u.s., canada, and mexico. the effects of the agreement regarding issues such as employment, the environment, and economic growth have been the subject of political disputes. most economic analyses indicate that nafta has been beneficial to the north american economies and the average citizen,[4][5][6] but has harmed a small minority of workers in industries exposed to trade competition.[7][8] economists hold that withdrawing from nafta or renegotiating nafta in a way that reestablishes trade barriers would adversely affect the u.s. economy and cost jobs.[9][10][11] however, mexico would be much more severely affected by job loss and reduction of economic growth in both the short term and long term.[12]

    after u.s. president donald trump took office in january 2017, he sought to replace nafta with a new agreement, beginning negotiations with canada and mexico. in september 2018, the united states, mexico, and canada reached an agreement to replace nafta with the united states–mexico–canada agreement (usmca). nafta will remain in force, pending the ratification of the usmca.[13]

  • negotiation, signing, ratification, and revision (1988–94)
  • provisions
  • adjudication
  • impact
  • disputes and controversies
  • policy of the trump administration
  • trans-pacific partnership
  • american public opinion on nafta
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

North American Free Trade Agreement

  • Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte  (Spanish)
  • Accord de Libre-échange Nord-Américain  (French)
Logo of the NAFTA Secretariat of North American Free Trade Agreement
Logo of the NAFTA Secretariat
Location of North American Free Trade Agreement
Languages
TypeFree trade area
Member states
EstablishmentJanuary 1, 1994; 26 years ago (1994-01-01)[1]
Area
• Total
21,578,137 km2 (8,331,365 sq mi)
• Water (%)
7.4
Population
• 2018 estimate
490,000,000
• Density
22.3/km2 (57.8/sq mi)
GDP (PPP)2018 estimate
• Total
$24.8 trillion[2]
• Per capita
$50,700
NAFTA GDP – 2012 : IMF – World Economic Outlook Databases (Oct 2013)

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA; Spanish: Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte, TLCAN; French: Accord de libre-échange nord-américain, ALÉNA) is an agreement signed by Canada, Mexico, and the United States, creating a trilateral trade bloc in North America. The agreement came into force on January 1, 1994, and superseded the 1988 Canada–United States Free Trade Agreement between the United States and Canada. The NAFTA trade bloc is one of the largest trade blocs in the world by gross domestic product.

The impetus for a North American free trade zone began with U.S. President Ronald Reagan, who made the idea part of his 1980 presidential campaign. After the signing of the Canada–United States Free Trade Agreement in 1988, the administrations of U.S. President George H. W. Bush, Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, and Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney agreed to negotiate what became NAFTA. Each submitted the agreement for ratification in their respective capitals in December 1992, but NAFTA faced significant opposition in both the United States and Canada. All three countries ratified NAFTA in 1993 after the addition of two side agreements, the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC) and the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC).

Passage of NAFTA resulted in the elimination or reduction of barriers to trade and investment between the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. The effects of the agreement regarding issues such as employment, the environment, and economic growth have been the subject of political disputes. Most economic analyses indicate that NAFTA has been beneficial to the North American economies and the average citizen,[4][5][6] but has harmed a small minority of workers in industries exposed to trade competition.[7][8] Economists hold that withdrawing from NAFTA or renegotiating NAFTA in a way that reestablishes trade barriers would adversely affect the U.S. economy and cost jobs.[9][10][11] However, Mexico would be much more severely affected by job loss and reduction of economic growth in both the short term and long term.[12]

After U.S. President Donald Trump took office in January 2017, he sought to replace NAFTA with a new agreement, beginning negotiations with Canada and Mexico. In September 2018, the United States, Mexico, and Canada reached an agreement to replace NAFTA with the United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA). NAFTA will remain in force, pending the ratification of the USMCA.[13]

Other Languages
Afrikaans: NAFTA
العربية: نافتا
беларуская: НАФТА
čeština: NAFTA
eesti: NAFTA
føroyskt: NAFTA
客家語/Hak-kâ-ngî: Pet-mî Chhṳ-yù Mo-yi Hia̍p-ngi
norsk: NAFTA
slovenščina: Sporazum NAFTA
suomi: NAFTA