Negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus

  • negative ssrna virus
    ebola virus tem phil 1832 lores.jpg
    ebola virus
    virus classification
    group:
    group v ((−)ssrna)
    order, family, and genus
    • order mononegavirales
      • family bornaviridae
      • family filoviridae
      • family mymonaviridae
      • family nyamiviridae
      • family paramyxoviridae
      • family pneumoviridae
      • family rhabdoviridae
      • family sunviridae
    • order bunyavirales
      • family feraviridae
      • family fimoviridae
      • family hantaviridae
      • family jonviridae
      • family nairoviridae
      • family peribunyaviridae
      • family phasmaviridae
      • family phenuiviridae
      • family tospoviridae
    • unassigned families:
      • family arenaviridae
      • family ophioviridae
      • family orthomyxoviridae
    • unassigned genera:
      • genus deltavirus

    a negative-sense single-stranded rna virus (or (-)ssrna virus) is a virus that uses negative sense, single-stranded rna as its genetic material. single stranded rna viruses are classified as positive or negative depending on the sense or polarity of the rna. the negative viral rna is complementary to the mrna and must be converted to a positive rna by rna polymerase before translation. therefore, the purified rna of a negative sense virus is not infectious by itself, as it needs to be converted to a positive sense rna for replication. these viruses belong to group v on the baltimore classification.[1]

    in addition, negative-sense single-stranded rna viruses have complex genomic sequences, cell cycles, and replication habits that use various protein complexes to arrange in specific conformations and carry out necessary processes for survival and reproduction of their genomic sequences. the complexity of negative-sense single-stranded rna viruses carries into its ability to suppress the innate immune response of the cells it infects and the construction of a capsid, which is unique to the varying classifications of negative-sense single-stranded rna viruses.

  • replication
  • taxonomy
  • host range
  • genome
  • nsv life cycle and replication
  • molecular mechanisms of innate antiviral immune inhibition
  • nnsv-mediated inhibition of ifn induction
  • nnsv-mediated inhibition of ifn response
  • ubiquitination
  • common mechanism for rna encapsidation by nsvs
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Negative ssRNA Virus
Ebola Virus TEM PHIL 1832 lores.jpg
Ebola Virus
Virus classification
Group:
Group V ((−)ssRNA)
Order, Family, and Genus

A negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus (or (-)ssRNA virus) is a virus that uses negative sense, single-stranded RNA as its genetic material. Single stranded RNA viruses are classified as positive or negative depending on the sense or polarity of the RNA. The negative viral RNA is complementary to the mRNA and must be converted to a positive RNA by RNA polymerase before translation. Therefore, the purified RNA of a negative sense virus is not infectious by itself, as it needs to be converted to a positive sense RNA for replication. These viruses belong to Group V on the Baltimore classification.[1]

In addition, negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses have complex genomic sequences, cell cycles, and replication habits that use various protein complexes to arrange in specific conformations and carry out necessary processes for survival and reproduction of their genomic sequences. The complexity of negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses carries into its ability to suppress the innate immune response of the cells it infects and the construction of a capsid, which is unique to the varying classifications of negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses.