Luzerne County, Pennsylvania

  • luzerne county, pennsylvania
    county
    official seal of luzerne county, pennsylvania
    seal
    topographical map of luzerne county
    topographical map of luzerne county
    location in the u.s. state of pennsylvania
    location in the u.s. state of pennsylvania
    country united states of america
    state pennsylvania
    regionnortheastern pennsylvania
    metro areawyoming valley
    formedseptember 25, 1786
    named forchevalier de la luzerne
    county seatwilkes-barre
    largest citywilkes-barre
    government
     • typecouncil–manager
     • council
     • council chairtim mcginley (d)
     • managerc. david pedri
    area
     • total906 sq mi (2,350 km2)
     • land890 sq mi (2,300 km2)
     • water16 sq mi (40 km2)
    highest elevation
    2,460 ft (750 m)
    lowest elevation
    512 ft (156 m)
    population
     (2010)
     • total320,918
     • estimate 
    (2018)
    317,646
     • density350/sq mi (140/km2)
    time zoneutc−5 (est)
     • summer (dst)utc−4 (edt)
    area code(s)www.luzernecounty.org

    luzerne county is a county in the commonwealth of pennsylvania. according to the u.s. census bureau, the county has a total area of 906 square miles (2,350 km2), of which 890 square miles (2,300 km2) is land and 16 square miles (41 km2) is water. it is northeastern pennsylvania's second-largest county by total area. as of the 2010 census, the population was 320,918, making it the most populous county in the northeastern part of the state. the county seat and largest city is wilkes-barre.[1] other populous communities include hazleton, kingston, nanticoke, and pittston. luzerne county is included in the scranton–wilkes-barre–hazleton metropolitan statistical area, which has a total population of 555,426 (as of 2017).

    on september 25, 1786, luzerne county was formed from part of northumberland county. it was named after chevalier de la luzerne, a french soldier and diplomat during the 18th century. when it was founded, luzerne county occupied a large portion of northeastern pennsylvania. from 1810 to 1878, it was divided into several smaller counties. the counties of bradford, lackawanna, susquehanna, and wyoming were all formed from parts of luzerne county.[2][3]

    the county gained prominence in the 19th and 20th centuries as an active anthracite coal mining region, drawing a large portion of its labor force from european immigrants. at its peak (in 1930), the county's population was 445,109. by the early 21st century, many factories and coal mines were closed. like most counties in the rust belt, luzerne witnessed population loss and urban decay.

  • history
  • geography
  • climate
  • demographics
  • government
  • politics
  • public safety
  • healthcare
  • education
  • culture
  • transportation
  • communities
  • notable people
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • external links

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
Official seal of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
Seal
Topographical map of Luzerne County
Topographical map of Luzerne County
Location in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Location in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania
Country United States of America
State Pennsylvania
RegionNortheastern Pennsylvania
Metro areaWyoming Valley
FormedSeptember 25, 1786
Named forChevalier de la Luzerne
County seatWilkes-Barre
Largest cityWilkes-Barre
Government
 • TypeCouncil–manager
 • Council
 • Council ChairTim McGinley (D)
 • ManagerC. David Pedri
Area
 • Total906 sq mi (2,350 km2)
 • Land890 sq mi (2,300 km2)
 • Water16 sq mi (40 km2)
Highest elevation
2,460 ft (750 m)
Lowest elevation
512 ft (156 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total320,918
 • Estimate 
(2018)
317,646
 • Density350/sq mi (140/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Area code(s)www.luzernecounty.org

Luzerne County is a county in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 906 square miles (2,350 km2), of which 890 square miles (2,300 km2) is land and 16 square miles (41 km2) is water. It is Northeastern Pennsylvania's second-largest county by total area. As of the 2010 census, the population was 320,918, making it the most populous county in the northeastern part of the state. The county seat and largest city is Wilkes-Barre.[1] Other populous communities include Hazleton, Kingston, Nanticoke, and Pittston. Luzerne County is included in the Scranton–Wilkes-Barre–Hazleton Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a total population of 555,426 (as of 2017).

On September 25, 1786, Luzerne County was formed from part of Northumberland County. It was named after Chevalier de la Luzerne, a French soldier and diplomat during the 18th century. When it was founded, Luzerne County occupied a large portion of Northeastern Pennsylvania. From 1810 to 1878, it was divided into several smaller counties. The counties of Bradford, Lackawanna, Susquehanna, and Wyoming were all formed from parts of Luzerne County.[2][3]

The county gained prominence in the 19th and 20th centuries as an active anthracite coal mining region, drawing a large portion of its labor force from European immigrants. At its peak (in 1930), the county's population was 445,109. By the early 21st century, many factories and coal mines were closed. Like most counties in the Rust Belt, Luzerne witnessed population loss and urban decay.

Other Languages
한국어: 루체른군
বিষ্ণুপ্রিয়া মণিপুরী: লুজের্নে কাউন্টি, পেনসিলভানিয়া
Mìng-dĕ̤ng-ngṳ̄: Luzerne Gông (Pennsylvania)
Nederlands: Luzerne County
Plattdüütsch: Luzerne County
português: Condado de Luzerne
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
Türkçe: Luzerne County
中文: 路澤恩縣