Lost film

A lost film is a feature or short film that is no longer known to exist in any studio archives, private collections, or public archives, such as the U.S. Library of Congress. [1]

Lon Chaney in London After Midnight (1927), one of the most sought-after lost films. The last known print was destroyed in the 1967 MGM vault fire, leaving only a set of production stills as a visual record.

Conditions

During most of the 20th century, U.S. copyright law required at least one copy of every American film to be deposited at the Library of Congress, at the time of copyright registration, but the Librarian of Congress was not required to retain those copies: "Under the provisions of the act of March 4, 1909, authority is granted for the return to the claimant of copyright of such copyright deposits as are not required by the Library." [2] Of American silent films, far more have been lost than have survived, and of American sound films made from 1927 to 1950, perhaps half have been lost. [3]

The phrase "lost film" can also be used in a literal sense for instances where footage of deleted scenes, unedited, and alternative versions of feature films are known to have been created, but can no longer be accounted for. Sometimes, a copy of a lost film is rediscovered. A film that has not been recovered in its entirety is called a partially lost film. For example, the 1922 film Sherlock Holmes was eventually discovered, but some of the footage is still missing.

Other Languages
العربية: فيلم مفقود
español: Film perdido
français: Film perdu
Bahasa Indonesia: Film hilang
italiano: Film perduto
Bahasa Melayu: Filem hilang
Nederlands: Verloren film
português: Filme perdido
română: Film pierdut
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Izgubljeni film
中文: 散失電影