Leeward Caribbean Creole English

  • antiguan english creole
    antiguan creole
    saint kitts creole
    native toantigua and barbuda
    native speakers
    150,000 (2001–2011)[1]
    language family
    english creole
    • atlantic
      • eastern
        • southern
          • northern antilles
            • antiguan english creole
    dialects
    • saint kitts creole
    • montserrat creole
    • anguillan creole
    • kokoy creole
    language codes
    iso 639-3aig
    anti1245[2]
    linguasphere52-abb-apf to -apm
    this article contains ipa phonetic symbols. without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of unicode characters. for an introductory guide on ipa symbols, see help:ipa.

    leeward caribbean creole english, is an english-based creole language consisting of several varieties spoken on the islands of antigua, barbuda, montserrat, nevis, and saint kitts.

    there are subtle differences in the language's usage by different speakers, and islanders often use it in combination with standard english. the tendency to switch back and forth from creole to standard english often seems to correlate with the class status of the speaker. persons of higher social status tend to switch between standard english and creole more readily, due to their more extensive formal education in the english-language school system. creole usage is more common, and is less similar to standard english, as speakers descend the socioeconomic ladder. this is an example of a creole continuum.

    many creole words are derived from english or african origins. the creole was formed when slaves owned by english planters imitated the english of their enslavers but pronounced it with their own inflections. this can be easily seen in phrases such as "me nah go", meaning "i am not going," or in "ent it?," presumably a cognate of "ain't it?"

  • vocabulary
  • pronunciation
  • sociohistorical influence
  • language use
  • the pronominal system
  • see also
  • references

Antiguan English Creole
Antiguan Creole
Saint Kitts Creole
Native toAntigua and Barbuda
Native speakers
150,000 (2001–2011)[1]
English Creole
  • Atlantic
    • Eastern
      • Southern
        • Northern Antilles
          • Antiguan English Creole
Dialects
Language codes
ISO 639-3aig
anti1245[2]
Linguasphere52-ABB-apf to -apm
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

Leeward Caribbean Creole English, is an English-based creole language consisting of several varieties spoken on the islands of Antigua, Barbuda, Montserrat, Nevis, and Saint Kitts.

There are subtle differences in the language's usage by different speakers, and islanders often use it in combination with Standard English. The tendency to switch back and forth from Creole to Standard English often seems to correlate with the class status of the speaker. Persons of higher social status tend to switch between Standard English and Creole more readily, due to their more extensive formal education in the English-language school system. Creole usage is more common, and is less similar to Standard English, as speakers descend the socioeconomic ladder. This is an example of a Creole continuum.

Many Creole words are derived from English or African origins. The creole was formed when slaves owned by English planters imitated the English of their enslavers but pronounced it with their own inflections. This can be easily seen in phrases such as "Me nah go", meaning "I am not going," or in "Ent it?," presumably a cognate of "Ain't it?"