Languages of the European Union

  • languages of the european union
    official
    • bulgarian
    • croatian
    • czech
    • danish
    • dutch
    • english
    • estonian
    • finnish
    • french
    • german
    • greek
    • hungarian
    • irish
    • italian
    • latvian
    • lithuanian
    • maltese
    • polish
    • portuguese
    • romanian
    • slovak
    • slovene
    • spanish
    • swedish

    the languages of the european union are languages used by people within the member states of the european union (eu).

    the eu has 24 official languages, of which three (english, french and german) have the higher status of "procedural" languages[1] of the european commission (whereas the european parliament accepts all official languages as working languages[2]). one language (irish) previously had the lower status of "treaty language" before being upgraded to an official and working language in 2007, although it has been temporarily derogated as a working language until 2021 due to difficulty finding qualified translators.[3][4] the three procedural languages are those used in the day-to-day workings of the institutions of the eu. the designation of irish as a "treaty language" meant that only the treaties of the european union were translated into irish, whereas legal acts of the european union adopted under the treaties (like directives and regulations) did not have to be. luxembourgish and turkish (which have official status in luxembourg and cyprus, respectively) are the only two national languages in the eu that are not official languages of the eu.

    the eu asserts that it is in favour of linguistic diversity. this principle is enshrined in the eu charter of fundamental rights (art. 22) and in the treaty on european union (art. 3(3) teu).

    in the european union, language policy is the responsibility of member states and eu does not have a common language policy; european union institutions play a supporting role in this field, based on the principle of "subsidiarity", they promote a european dimension in the member states' language policies. the eu encourages all its citizens to be multilingual; specifically, it encourages them to be able to speak two languages in addition to their native language.[5] though the eu has very limited influence in this area as the content of educational systems is the responsibility of individual member states, a number of eu funding programmes actively promote language learning and linguistic diversity.[6]

    the most widely understood language in the eu is english, which is understood by 44% of all adults, while german is the most widely used mother tongue, spoken by 18%. all 24 official languages of the eu are accepted as working languages, but in practice only three – english, french, and german – are in wide general use, and of these english[7][8][9][10] is the more commonly used. french is an official language in all three of the cities that are political centres of the union: brussels (belgium), strasbourg (france) and luxembourg city (luxembourg).

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Languages of the European Union
Official

The languages of the European Union are languages used by people within the member states of the European Union (EU).

The EU has 24 official languages, of which three (English, French and German) have the higher status of "procedural" languages[1] of the European Commission (whereas the European Parliament accepts all official languages as working languages[2]). One language (Irish) previously had the lower status of "treaty language" before being upgraded to an official and working language in 2007, although it has been temporarily derogated as a working language until 2021 due to difficulty finding qualified translators.[3][4] The three procedural languages are those used in the day-to-day workings of the institutions of the EU. The designation of Irish as a "treaty language" meant that only the treaties of the European Union were translated into Irish, whereas Legal Acts of the European Union adopted under the treaties (like Directives and Regulations) did not have to be. Luxembourgish and Turkish (which have official status in Luxembourg and Cyprus, respectively) are the only two national languages in the EU that are not official languages of the EU.

The EU asserts that it is in favour of linguistic diversity. This principle is enshrined in the EU Charter of fundamental rights (art. 22) and in the Treaty on European Union (art. 3(3) TEU).

In the European Union, language policy is the responsibility of member states and EU does not have a common language policy; European Union institutions play a supporting role in this field, based on the principle of "subsidiarity", they promote a European dimension in the member states' language policies. The EU encourages all its citizens to be multilingual; specifically, it encourages them to be able to speak two languages in addition to their native language.[5] Though the EU has very limited influence in this area as the content of educational systems is the responsibility of individual member states, a number of EU funding programmes actively promote language learning and linguistic diversity.[6]

The most widely understood language in the EU is English, which is understood by 44% of all adults, while German is the most widely used mother tongue, spoken by 18%. All 24 official languages of the EU are accepted as working languages, but in practice only three – English, French, and German – are in wide general use, and of these English[7][8][9][10] is the more commonly used. French is an official language in all three of the cities that are political centres of the Union: Brussels (Belgium), Strasbourg (France) and Luxembourg City (Luxembourg).

Other Languages
Bahasa Melayu: Bahasa Kesatuan Eropah
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Jezici Evropske unije