Lancaster Park

Lancaster Park
Lancaster Park
Lancaster Park aerial July 2011.jpg
2011 aerial view of earthquake damaged Lancaster Park
Former namesJade Stadium (1998–2007)
AMI Stadium (2007–2011)
LocationChristchurch, New Zealand
Coordinates43°32′31″S 172°39′15″E / 43°32′31″S 172°39′15″E / -43.54194; 172.65417
OwnerVictoria Park Trust
OperatorVBase Venue management
Capacity38,628[1]
Field sizeCricket Oval
SurfaceGrass
Construction
Broke ground1880
Opened1881
Renovated1995–2009
Expanded2009
Closed2011
DemolishedBeginning 2012
Tenants
Crusaders (Super Rugby) (1996–2011)
Canterbury (ITM Cup)
Ground information
End names
Hadlee Stand End
Port Hills End
International information
First Test10–13 January 1930:
 New Zealand v  England
Last Test7–9 December 2006:
 New Zealand v  Sri Lanka
First ODI11 February 1973:
 New Zealand v  Pakistan
Last ODI29 January 2011:
 New Zealand v  Pakistan
First T20I7 February 2008:
 New Zealand v  England
Last T20I30 December 2010:
 New Zealand v  Pakistan
First women's Test16–18 February 1935:
 New Zealand v  England
Last women's Test29 November – 2 December 1957:
 New Zealand v  England
First WODI7 February 1982:
 Australia v  England
Last WODI15 February 1999:
 New Zealand v  South Africa
Only WT20I28 February 2010:
 New Zealand v  Australia
As of 26 April 2017
Source: ESPNcricinfo

Lancaster Park, previously known as Jade Stadium and AMI Stadium, was a sports stadium in Waltham, a suburb of Christchurch in New Zealand. The stadium was closed due to damage sustained in the February 2011 Christchurch earthquake. The Hadlee Stand has been demolished and the fate of the rest of the stadium is unresolved.

The stadium had been the venue for various sports including rugby union, cricket, rugby league, association football, athletics and trotting. It had also hosted various non-sporting events including concerts by Pearl Jam in 2009, Bon Jovi in 2008, Roger Waters in 2007, Meat Loaf in 2004, U2 in 1989 & 1993, Tina Turner in 1993 and 1997, Dire Straits in 1986 and 1991, and Billy Joel in 1987. However the stadium was primarily a rugby and cricket ground and was the home of the Crusaders rugby union team, who compete in Super Rugby. Its capacity was 38,628.[1]

History

Ownership

In 1880 Canterbury Cricket and Athletics Sports Co. Ltd was established. In 1882, Edward Stevens and Arthur Ollivier initiated the purchase of a parcel of swampy farmland (the actual cricket ground was in low-lying area and basically sitting on a large pool of saturated land) which became Lancaster Park, and Lancaster was the name of the farmer and previous landlord.[2][3] For Stevens, this was a transaction through his company, Harman and Stevens, on behalf of the owner, Benjamin Lancaster.[4] Canterbury Cricket and Athletics Sports purchased 10 acres 3 rods 30 perches (4.426 hectares) for £2,841 at £260 per acre (NZ$ 1284.95/hectare). In 1904 Canterbury cricket would become the sole owner of the ground. Then in 1911 the Canterbury Rugby Union became co-owners with the Canterbury Cricket Association over the ground. An Act of Parliament in November 1919 vested title to Lancaster Park in the Crown, and established the Victory Park Board to take responsibility for its management.

JADE Stadium Limited was established in December 1998 to manage the existing facilities on behalf of the Victory Park Board and the Christchurch City Council. A five-member board of directors, drawn from Christchurch's business community and the Christchurch City Council, governed the company.

Official opening

In 1881 the first cricket match to be played on the ground was scheduled for the opening on 8 October, but it was cancelled because of rain. An athletics meeting became the first event held on the ground, on 15 October.

Financial difficulty

In 1912 a "Floral Fete", a festival, was held to raise funds to clear the debt of £2,000 in order to prevent the ground being cut up into building sites.

The financial difficulty the ground faced was so great that during New Zealand's involvement in World War I in 1915 the main oval at Lancaster Park was ploughed up and was used as a potato field in an attempt to raise more revenue.

Expansion

The embankment was expanded in 1957, increasing the capacity to 33,000. Two new stands were opened in 1965 further increasing the capacity to 38,500. In 1995 the Hadlee Stand opened in tribute to the successful cricketing family which came from Canterbury. The Hadlee stand was the first stand to be demolished due to earthquake damage. In 2000 saw the demolition of the embankment and No. 4 stand and the opening of the DB Draught stand (renamed the Tui stand in 2006) and the Paul Kelly Motor Company Stand (West Stand). Both stands sustained severe slump damage during the earthquake in 2011. Although deemed repairable it is unlikely they will be as the cost would be too expensive.

As part of a $60 million redevelopment for the 2011 Rugby World Cup, the Eastern Stands (No. 1, 2 and 3 stands) were demolished and replaced with the new Deans Stand. The Stand was designed to reflect the newly completed Western Stand. The total capacity was 38,500 and was to be raised to nearly 45,000 with temporary seating for the 2011 Rugby World Cup, in what would have made it the second largest stadium in New Zealand after Eden Park.[5]

Deans Stand

On Tuesday, 22 April 2008 a press release was issued announcing that the new East Stand, built to replace stands demolished in 2007, as part of a redevelopment of the Ground, was to be named the Deans Stand when it was officially opened in January 2010. The Deans Stand has a seating capacity of 13,000. The stand was severely damaged in the earthquake when the piles it stood on were violently forced up and then down in a wave motion. It is slated for demolition.

The Deans name has been a part of rugby at the stadium for more than a century. Bob Deans was an All Black and also captained the Canterbury rugby team, Bruce and Robbie Deans were both All Blacks and members of the Canterbury team with Robbie also coaching the Crusaders, Bob's brother Colin played rugby at the ground, Bruce & Robbie's father Tony played cricket on the ground, and in the sixth generation of the family Milly Deans is a member of the Canterbury women's rugby team. The name Deans is also the family name of the first successful settlers in the city with brothers John and William Deans building their house in 1843.[6]

Earthquake damage

The stadium was closed because of the severe damage sustained during the February 2011 Christchurch earthquake.[7] The first of its stands, the "Hadlee Stand", has been demolished. Seven 2011 Rugby World Cup matches scheduled for the stadium in September were moved to other venues.[8] Demolition of the rest of the stadium is expected to start in December 2017 and take approximately one year.[9] There is a rebuilding proposal to move the ground to within Christchurch's Four Avenues inner city boundary.[10] In the meantime, games would be played in the site of Rugby League Park.

Other Languages
български: Ланкастър Парк
català: AMI Stadium
Deutsch: AMI Stadium
español: Lancaster Park
français: AMI Stadium
galego: AMI Stadium
italiano: Lancaster Park
Nederlands: Lancaster Park
српски / srpski: АМИ Стадион