Kartvelian languages

Kartvelian
ქართველური
Geographic
distribution
Western Trans-Caucasus, Northeast Anatolia
Linguistic classificationOne of the world's primary language families
Proto-languageProto-Kartvelian
Subdivisions
ISO 639-5ccs
Glottologkart1248[1]

The Kartvelian languages (Georgian: ქართველური ენები, Kartveluri enebi, also known as Iberian[2] and formerly[3] South Caucasian[4]) are a language family indigenous to the Caucasus and spoken primarily in Georgia, with large groups of native speakers in Russia, Iran, the United States, the European Union, Israel,[5] and northeastern parts of Turkey.[6] There are approximately 5.2 million speakers of Kartvelian languages worldwide.The Kartvelian family is not known to be related to any other language family, making it one of the world's primary language families.[7] The first literary source in a Kartvelian language is the Georgian language inscriptions of Bir el Qutt, written in ancient Georgian Asomtavruli script at the Georgian monastery near Bethlehem,[8] which dates back to c. 430 AD.[9]

The Georgian script is the writing system used to write all Kartvelian languages, though the Laz language in Turkey is also written using a Latin script.

Social and cultural status

Georgian is the official language of Georgia (spoken by 90% of the population) and the main language for literary and business use for all Kartvelian speakers in Georgia. It is written with an original and distinctive alphabet, and the oldest surviving literary text dates from the 5th century AD—the only Caucasian language with an ancient literary tradition[citation needed]. The old Georgian script seems to have been derived from Aramaic, with Greek influences.[10]

Mingrelian has been written with the Georgian alphabet since 1864, especially in the period from 1930 to 1938, when the Mingrelians enjoyed some cultural autonomy, and after 1989.

The Laz language was written chiefly between 1927 and 1937, and now again in Turkey, with the Latin alphabet. Laz, however, is disappearing as its speakers are integrating into mainstream Turkish society.

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Kartweliese tale
azərbaycanca: Kartvel dilləri
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Картвэльскія мовы
íslenska: Kartvelsk mál
latviešu: Kartvelu valodas
lietuvių: Kartvelų kalbos
македонски: Картвелски јазици
norsk nynorsk: Kartvelske språk
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Kartvel tillari
Piemontèis: Lenghe kartvéliche
татарча/tatarça: Картвель телләре
українська: Картвельські мови
Tiếng Việt: Ngữ hệ Kartvelia