John Moore (British Army officer)

Sir John Moore
Sir John Moore by Sir Thomas Lawrence.jpg
Portrait, oil on canvas, of Sir John Moore
by Sir Thomas Lawrence (1769–1830)
Born13 November 1761
Glasgow, Scotland
Died16 January 1809(1809-01-16) (aged 47)
A Coruña, Galicia, Spain
AllegianceUnited Kingdom United Kingdom / British Empire
Service/branchBritish Army
Years of service1776 – 1809 (DOW)
RankLieutenant-General
Battles/wars

American War of Independence

French Revolutionary Wars

Irish Rebellion of 1798

Anglo-Russian invasion of Holland

French campaign in Egypt and Syria

Peninsular War

AwardsOrder of the Bath
Other workMP for Lanark Burghs

Lieutenant-General Sir John Moore, KB, (13 November 1761 – 16 January 1809) was a British soldier and General, also known as Moore of Corunna. He is best known for his military training reforms and for his death at the Battle of Corunna, in which he repulsed[1] a French army under Marshal Soult during the Peninsular War. After the war General Sarrazin wrote a French history of the battle, which nonetheless may have been written in light of subsequent events, stating that "Whatever Buonaparte may assert, Soult was most certainly repulsed at Corunna; and the British gained a defensive victory, though dearly purchased with the loss of their brave general Moore, who was alike distinguished for his private virtues, and his military talents."[a]

Early years

John Moore was born in Glasgow, the son of John Moore, a doctor and writer, and the older brother of Admiral Sir Graham Moore. He attended Glasgow High School, but at the age of eleven joined his father and Douglas, the young 16-year-old 8th Duke of Hamilton, (1756–1799), his father's pupil, on a grand tour of France, Italy and Germany. This included a two-year stay in Geneva, where Moore's education continued.

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