Jah

Jah or Yah (Hebrew: יהּ‬, Yah) is a short form of Yahweh (in consonantal spelling YHWH Hebrew: יהוה‬, called the Tetragrammaton), the proper name of God in the Hebrew Bible.[1] This short form of the name occurs 50 times in the text of the Hebrew Bible, of which 24 form part of the phrase "Hallelujah", which is actually a two-word phrase, not one word.

In an English-language context, the name Jah is now most commonly associated with the Rastafari. It is otherwise mostly limited to the phrase Hallelujah and theophoric names such as Elijah.In the King James Version (1611) there is only a single instance of JAH (capitalised), in Psalm 68:4. An American Translation (1939) follows KJV in using Yah in this verse.The conventional English pronunciation of Jah is ɑː/, even though the letter J here transliterates the palatal approximant (Hebrew י Yodh). The spelling Yah is designed to make the pronunciation ɑː/ explicit in an English-language context (see also romanization of Hebrew).

Hebrew names of God: Yahweh, Yahu, Yah

On the assumption that a and e are the correct vowels, Yahweh is a name of God in the Hebrew language. Yahu is a well-attested short form of the full or extended name Yahweh.[2] The short form Jah/Yah, which appears in Exodus 15:2 and 17:16, Psalm 89:9, Song of Songs 8:6,[3] is preserved also in theophoric names such as Elijah ("my god is Jah"), Malchijah ("my king is Jah"), and (Adonijah) "my lord is Jah", etc. as well as in the phrase Hallelujah. The name "Joel" is derived from combining the word Jah with the word El.

While pronouncing the Tetragrammaton (generally believed to have corresponded to "Yahweh") is forbidden for Jews, articulating "Jah"/"Yah" is allowed, but is usually confined to prayer and study.[3]

Other Languages
dansk: Jah
Ελληνικά: Γιαχ
français: Jah
한국어: 야 (기독교)
italiano: Jah
日本語: ヤハ
norsk: Jah
norsk nynorsk: Jah
Patois: Jah
polski: Jah
português: Jah
русский: Джа
slovenščina: Dža
svenska: Jah