International Criminal Court

  • international criminal court
    cour pénale internationale  (french)
    official logo of international criminal court cour pénale internationale  (french)
    official logo
    parties and signatories of the rome statute   state party   signatory that has not ratified   state party that subsequently withdrew its membership   signatory that subsequently withdrew its signature   non-state party, non-signatory
    parties and signatories of the rome statute
      state party
      signatory that has not ratified
      state party that subsequently withdrew its membership
      signatory that subsequently withdrew its signature
      non-state party, non-signatory
    seatthe hague, netherlands
    working languagesenglish
    french
    official languages[1]
    member states123
    leaders
    • president
    chile eboe-osuji
    • first vice-president
    robert fremr
    • prosecutor
    fatou bensouda
    • registrar
    peter lewis
    establishment
    • rome statute adopted
    17 july 1998
    • entered into force
    1 july 2002
    website
    www.icc-cpi.int
    the premises of the international criminal court in the hague, netherlands. the icc moved into this building in december 2015

    the international criminal court (icc or icct)[2] is an intergovernmental organization and international tribunal that sits in the hague, netherlands. the icc has jurisdiction to prosecute individuals for the international crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression. it is intended to complement existing national judicial systems and it may therefore exercise its jurisdiction only when certain conditions are met, such as when national courts are unwilling or unable to prosecute criminals or when the united nations security council or individual states refer situations to the court.

    the icc began functioning on 1 july 2002, the date that the rome statute entered into force. the rome statute is a multilateral treaty that serves as the icc's foundational and governing document. states which become party to the rome statute become member states of the icc. as of november 2019, there are 123 icc member states. 42 states are non-party, non-signatory states.

    the icc has four principal organs: the presidency, the judicial divisions, the office of the prosecutor, and the registry. the president is the most senior judge chosen by his or her peers in the judicial division, which hears cases before the court. the office of the prosecutor is headed by the prosecutor who investigates crimes and initiates criminal proceedings before the judicial division. the registry is headed by the registrar and is charged with managing all the administrative functions of the icc, including the headquarters, detention unit, and public defense office.

    the office of the prosecutor has opened twelve official investigations and is also conducting an additional nine preliminary examinations. thus far, 45 individuals have been indicted in the icc, including ugandan rebel leader joseph kony, former sudanese president omar al-bashir, kenyan president uhuru kenyatta, libyan leader muammar gaddafi, ivorian president laurent gbagbo, and dr congo vice-president jean-pierre bemba.

    the icc has faced a number of criticisms from states and civil society, including objections about its jurisdiction, accusations of bias, questioning of the fairness of its case-selection and trial procedures, and doubts about its effectiveness.

  • history
  • structure
  • jurisdiction and admissibility
  • individual criminal responsibility
  • procedure
  • facilities
  • finance
  • trial history to date
  • investigations and preliminary examinations
  • relationships
  • criticisms
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

International Criminal Court
Cour pénale internationale  (French)
Official logo of International Criminal Court Cour pénale internationale  (French)
Official logo
Parties and signatories of the Rome Statute   State party   Signatory that has not ratified   State party that subsequently withdrew its membership   Signatory that subsequently withdrew its signature   Non-state party, non-signatory
Parties and signatories of the Rome Statute
  State party
  Signatory that has not ratified
  State party that subsequently withdrew its membership
  Signatory that subsequently withdrew its signature
  Non-state party, non-signatory
SeatThe Hague, Netherlands
Working languagesEnglish
French
Official languages[1]
Member states123
Leaders
• President
Chile Eboe-Osuji
Robert Fremr
Fatou Bensouda
• Registrar
Peter Lewis
Establishment
• Rome Statute adopted
17 July 1998
• Entered into force
1 July 2002
The premises of the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands. The ICC moved into this building in December 2015

The International Criminal Court (ICC or ICCt)[2] is an intergovernmental organization and international tribunal that sits in The Hague, Netherlands. The ICC has jurisdiction to prosecute individuals for the international crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression. It is intended to complement existing national judicial systems and it may therefore exercise its jurisdiction only when certain conditions are met, such as when national courts are unwilling or unable to prosecute criminals or when the United Nations Security Council or individual states refer situations to the Court.

The ICC began functioning on 1 July 2002, the date that the Rome Statute entered into force. The Rome Statute is a multilateral treaty that serves as the ICC's foundational and governing document. States which become party to the Rome Statute become member states of the ICC. As of November 2019, there are 123 ICC member states. 42 states are non-party, non-signatory states.

The ICC has four principal organs: the Presidency, the Judicial Divisions, the Office of the Prosecutor, and the Registry. The President is the most senior judge chosen by his or her peers in the Judicial Division, which hears cases before the Court. The Office of the Prosecutor is headed by the Prosecutor who investigates crimes and initiates criminal proceedings before the Judicial Division. The Registry is headed by the Registrar and is charged with managing all the administrative functions of the ICC, including the headquarters, detention unit, and public defense office.

The Office of the Prosecutor has opened twelve official investigations and is also conducting an additional nine preliminary examinations. Thus far, 45 individuals have been indicted in the ICC, including Ugandan rebel leader Joseph Kony, former Sudanese president Omar al-Bashir, Kenyan president Uhuru Kenyatta, Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, Ivorian president Laurent Gbagbo, and DR Congo vice-president Jean-Pierre Bemba.

The ICC has faced a number of criticisms from states and civil society, including objections about its jurisdiction, accusations of bias, questioning of the fairness of its case-selection and trial procedures, and doubts about its effectiveness.

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беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Міжнародны крымінальны суд
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Međunarodni krivični sud
татарча/tatarça: Xalıqara cinäyät mäxkämäse