ISO 639-3

  • iso 639-3:2007, codes for the representation of names of languages – part 3: alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the iso 639 series. it defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. the standard was published by iso on 1 february 2007.[1]

    iso 639-3 extends the iso 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages. the extended language coverage was based primarily on the language codes used in the ethnologue (volumes 10-14) published by sil international, which is now the registration authority for iso 639-3.[2] it provides an enumeration of languages as complete as possible, including living and extinct, ancient and constructed, major and minor, written and unwritten.[1] however, it does not include reconstructed languages such as proto-indo-european.[3]

    iso 639-3 is intended for use as metadata codes in a wide range of applications. it is widely used in computer and information systems, such as the internet, in which many languages need to be supported. in archives and other information storage, they are used in cataloging systems, indicating what language a resource is in or about. the codes are also frequently used in the linguistic literature and elsewhere to compensate for the fact that language names may be obscure or ambiguous.

    find a language
    enter an iso 639-3 code to find the corresponding language article.
     
  • language codes
  • code space
  • macrolanguages
  • collective languages
  • special codes
  • maintenance processes
  • criticism
  • usage
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

ISO 639-3:2007, Codes for the representation of names of languages – Part 3: Alpha-3 code for comprehensive coverage of languages, is an international standard for language codes in the ISO 639 series. It defines three-letter codes for identifying languages. The standard was published by ISO on 1 February 2007.[1]

ISO 639-3 extends the ISO 639-2 alpha-3 codes with an aim to cover all known natural languages. The extended language coverage was based primarily on the language codes used in the Ethnologue (volumes 10-14) published by SIL International, which is now the registration authority for ISO 639-3.[2] It provides an enumeration of languages as complete as possible, including living and extinct, ancient and constructed, major and minor, written and unwritten.[1] However, it does not include reconstructed languages such as Proto-Indo-European.[3]

ISO 639-3 is intended for use as metadata codes in a wide range of applications. It is widely used in computer and information systems, such as the Internet, in which many languages need to be supported. In archives and other information storage, they are used in cataloging systems, indicating what language a resource is in or about. The codes are also frequently used in the linguistic literature and elsewhere to compensate for the fact that language names may be obscure or ambiguous.

Find a language
Enter an ISO 639-3 code to find the corresponding language article.
 

Other Languages
Alemannisch: ISO 639-3
العربية: أيزو 639-3
asturianu: ISO 639-3
azərbaycanca: ISO 639-3
भोजपुरी: आइएसओ 639-3
Bikol Central: ISO 639-3
brezhoneg: ISO 639-3
čeština: ISO 639-3
Cymraeg: ISO 639-3
dansk: ISO 639-3
eesti: ISO 639-3
Ελληνικά: ISO 639-3
español: ISO 639-3
Esperanto: ISO 639-3
estremeñu: ISO 639-3
euskara: ISO 639-3
français: ISO 639-3
Ilokano: ISO 639-3
italiano: ISO 639-3
Jawa: ISO 639-3
latviešu: ISO 639-3
lietuvių: ISO 639-3
lumbaart: ISO 639-3
македонски: ISO 639-3
Bahasa Melayu: ISO 639-3
日本語: ISO 639-3
polski: ISO 639-3
Scots: ISO 639-3
sicilianu: ISO 639-3
Simple English: ISO 639-3
slovenčina: ISO 639-3
Tagalog: ISO 639-3
தமிழ்: ஐ.எசு.ஓ 639-3
ไทย: ISO 639-3
Türkçe: ISO 639-3
українська: ISO 639-3
اردو: آیزو 639-3
ئۇيغۇرچە / Uyghurche: ISO 639-3
Tiếng Việt: ISO 639-3
Yorùbá: ISO 639-3
粵語: ISO 639-3
中文: ISO 639-3