High Efficiency Video Coding

  • hevc / h.265 / mpeg-h part 2
    high efficiency video coding
    statusin force
    year started2013
    latest versionjune 2019
    organizationitu-t, iso, iec
    committeevceg, mpeg
    base standardsh.261, h.262, h.263, h.264, mpeg-1
    domainhttps://www.itu.int/rec/t-rec-h.265

    high efficiency video coding (hevc), also known as h.265 and mpeg-h part 2, is a video compression standard, designed as a successor to the widely used advanced video coding (avc, h.264, or mpeg-4 part 10). in comparison to avc, hevc offers from 25% to 50% better data compression at the same level of video quality, or substantially improved video quality at the same bit rate. it supports resolutions up to 8192×4320, including 8k uhd, and unlike the primarily 8-bit avc, hevc's higher fidelity main10 profile has been incorporated into nearly all supporting hardware. hevc is competing with the royalty-free av1 coding format for standardization by the video standard working group netvc of the internet engineering task force (ietf).[1]

    while avc uses the integer discrete cosine transform (dct) with 4x4 and 8x8 block sizes, hevc uses integer dct and dst transforms with varied block sizes between 4x4 and 32x32. the high efficiency image format (heif) is based on hevc.[2] as of 2019, hevc is used by 43% of video developers, and is the second most widely used video coding format after avc.[3]

  • concept
  • history
  • coding efficiency
  • features
  • profiles
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  • containers
  • patent license terms
  • versatile video coding
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

HEVC / H.265 / MPEG-H Part 2
High efficiency video coding
StatusIn force
Year started2013
Latest versionJune 2019
OrganizationITU-T, ISO, IEC
CommitteeVCEG, MPEG
Base standardsH.261, H.262, H.263, H.264, MPEG-1
Domainhttps://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-H.265

High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), also known as H.265 and MPEG-H Part 2, is a video compression standard, designed as a successor to the widely used Advanced Video Coding (AVC, H.264, or MPEG-4 Part 10). In comparison to AVC, HEVC offers from 25% to 50% better data compression at the same level of video quality, or substantially improved video quality at the same bit rate. It supports resolutions up to 8192×4320, including 8K UHD, and unlike the primarily 8-bit AVC, HEVC's higher fidelity Main10 profile has been incorporated into nearly all supporting hardware. HEVC is competing with the royalty-free AV1 coding format for standardization by the video standard working group NetVC of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).[1]

While AVC uses the integer discrete cosine transform (DCT) with 4x4 and 8x8 block sizes, HEVC uses integer DCT and DST transforms with varied block sizes between 4x4 and 32x32. The High Efficiency Image Format (HEIF) is based on HEVC.[2] As of 2019, HEVC is used by 43% of video developers, and is the second most widely used video coding format after AVC.[3]