Francis Bacon

  • the right honourable

    the viscount st. alban

    pc qc
    somer francis bacon.jpg
    portrait by pourbus the younger, 1617
    lord high chancellor of england
    in office
    7 march 1617 – 3 may 1621 (1617-03-07 – 1621-05-03)
    monarchjames i
    preceded bysir thomas egerton
    succeeded byjohn williams
    attorney general of england and wales
    in office
    26 october 1613 – 7 march 1617 (1613-10-26 – 1617-03-07)
    monarchjames i
    preceded bysir henry hobart
    succeeded bysir henry yelverton
    personal details
    born(1561-01-22)22 january 1561
    the strand, london, england
    died9 april 1626(1626-04-09) (aged 65)
    highgate, middlesex, england
    buried
    st. michael's church, st. albans
    motherlady anne bacon
    fathersir nicholas bacon
    alma mater
    • university of cambridge
    • trinity college, cambridge
    • university of poitiers
    notable workworks by francis bacon
    signature

    philosophy career
    notable work
    novum organum
    erarenaissance philosophy
    17th-century philosophy
    regionwestern philosophy
    schoolempiricism
    main interests
    • natural philosophy
    • philosophical logic
    notable ideas

    francis bacon, 1st viscount st alban,[a] pc qc (ən/;[5] 22 january 1561 – 9 april 1626), also known as lord verulam, was an english philosopher and statesman who served as attorney general and as lord chancellor of england. his works are credited with developing the scientific method and remained influential through the scientific revolution.[6]

    bacon has been called the father of empiricism.[7] his works argued for the possibility of scientific knowledge based only upon inductive reasoning and careful observation of events in nature. most importantly, he argued science could be achieved by use of a sceptical and methodical approach whereby scientists aim to avoid misleading themselves. although his practical ideas about such a method, the baconian method, did not have a long-lasting influence, the general idea of the importance and possibility of a sceptical methodology makes bacon the father of the scientific method. this method was a new rhetorical and theoretical framework for science, the practical details of which are still central in debates about science and methodology.

    francis bacon was a patron of libraries and developed a functional system for the cataloging of books by dividing them into three categories—history, poetry, and philosophy—which could further be divided into more specific subjects and subheadings. bacon was educated at trinity college, cambridge, where he rigorously followed the medieval curriculum, largely in latin.

    bacon was the first recipient of the queen's counsel designation, which was conferred in 1597 when elizabeth i of england reserved bacon as her legal advisor. after the accession of james vi and i in 1603, bacon was knighted. he was later created baron verulam in 1618[4] and viscount st. alban in 1621.[3][b]

    because he had no heirs, both titles became extinct upon his death in 1626, at 65 years. bacon died of pneumonia, with one account by john aubrey stating that he had contracted the condition while studying the effects of freezing on the preservation of meat. he is buried at st michael's church, st albans, hertfordshire.[8]

  • biography
  • philosophy and works
  • influence
  • historical debates
  • bibliography
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • sources
  • further reading
  • external links


The Viscount St. Alban

Somer Francis Bacon.jpg
Portrait by Pourbus the Younger, 1617
Lord High Chancellor of England
In office
7 March 1617 – 3 May 1621 (1617-03-07 – 1621-05-03)
MonarchJames I
Preceded bySir Thomas Egerton
Succeeded byJohn Williams
Attorney General of England and Wales
In office
26 October 1613 – 7 March 1617 (1613-10-26 – 1617-03-07)
MonarchJames I
Preceded bySir Henry Hobart
Succeeded bySir Henry Yelverton
Personal details
Born(1561-01-22)22 January 1561
The Strand, London, England
Died9 April 1626(1626-04-09) (aged 65)
Highgate, Middlesex, England
Buried
MotherLady Anne Bacon
FatherSir Nicholas Bacon
Alma mater
Notable workWorks by Francis Bacon
Signature

Philosophy career
Notable work
Novum Organum
EraRenaissance philosophy
17th-century philosophy
RegionWestern philosophy
SchoolEmpiricism
Main interests
Notable ideas

Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban,[a] PC QC (ən/;[5] 22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626), also known as Lord Verulam, was an English philosopher and statesman who served as Attorney General and as Lord Chancellor of England. His works are credited with developing the scientific method and remained influential through the scientific revolution.[6]

Bacon has been called the father of empiricism.[7] His works argued for the possibility of scientific knowledge based only upon inductive reasoning and careful observation of events in nature. Most importantly, he argued science could be achieved by use of a sceptical and methodical approach whereby scientists aim to avoid misleading themselves. Although his practical ideas about such a method, the Baconian method, did not have a long-lasting influence, the general idea of the importance and possibility of a sceptical methodology makes Bacon the father of the scientific method. This method was a new rhetorical and theoretical framework for science, the practical details of which are still central in debates about science and methodology.

Francis Bacon was a patron of libraries and developed a functional system for the cataloging of books by dividing them into three categories—history, poetry, and philosophy—which could further be divided into more specific subjects and subheadings. Bacon was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he rigorously followed the medieval curriculum, largely in Latin.

Bacon was the first recipient of the Queen's counsel designation, which was conferred in 1597 when Elizabeth I of England reserved Bacon as her legal advisor. After the accession of James VI and I in 1603, Bacon was knighted. He was later created Baron Verulam in 1618[4] and Viscount St. Alban in 1621.[3][b]

Because he had no heirs, both titles became extinct upon his death in 1626, at 65 years. Bacon died of pneumonia, with one account by John Aubrey stating that he had contracted the condition while studying the effects of freezing on the preservation of meat. He is buried at St Michael's Church, St Albans, Hertfordshire.[8]

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