Ebolavirus

  • ebolavirus
    ebola virus under electron microscope
    ebola virus under transmission electron microscope
    virus classification e
    (unranked): virus
    realm: riboviria
    phylum: negarnaviricota
    class: monjiviricetes
    order: mononegavirales
    family: filoviridae
    genus: ebolavirus
    type species
    zaire ebolavirus
    species
    • bombali ebolavirus
    • bundibugyo ebolavirus
    • reston ebolavirus
    • sudan ebolavirus
    • tai forest ebolavirus
    • zaire ebolavirus
    phylogenetic tree comparing ebolaviruses and marburgviruses. numbers indicate percent confidence of branches.

    the genus ebolavirus (s/ vy-rəs)[1] is a virological taxon included in the family filoviridae, order mononegavirales.[1] the members of this genus are called ebolaviruses.[1] the six known virus species are named for the region where each was originally identified: bundibugyo ebolavirus, reston ebolavirus, sudan ebolavirus, taï forest ebolavirus (originally côte d'ivoire ebolavirus), zaire ebolavirus, and bombali ebolavirus. the last is the most recent species to be named and was isolated from angolan free-tailed bats in sierra leone.[2]

    each species of the genus ebolavirus has one member virus, and four of these cause ebola virus disease (evd) in humans, a type of hemorrhagic fever having a very high case fatality rate. the reston virus has caused evd in other primates.[3][4] zaire ebolavirus is the type species (reference or example species) for ebolavirus, has the highest mortality rate of the ebolaviruses, and is responsible for the largest number of outbreaks of the six known species of the genus, including the 1976 zaire outbreak and the outbreak with the most deaths (2014).

    ebolaviruses were first described after outbreaks of evd in southern sudan in june 1976 and in zaire in august 1976.[5][6] the name ebolavirus is derived from the ebola river in zaire (now the democratic republic of the congo), the location of the 1976 outbreak,[6] and the taxonomic suffix -virus (denoting a viral genus).[1] this genus was introduced in 1998 as the "ebola-like viruses".[7][8] in 2002, the name was changed to ebolavirus[9][10] and in 2010, the genus was emended.[1] ebolaviruses are closely related to marburgviruses.

  • hosts of the ebolavirus
  • entry pathway
  • taxonomy notes
  • genus inclusion criteria
  • classification
  • evolution
  • genus organization and common names
  • research
  • notes
  • references
  • external links

Ebolavirus
Ebola virus under electron microscope
Ebola virus under transmission electron microscope
Virus classification e
(unranked): Virus
Realm: Riboviria
Phylum: Negarnaviricota
Class: Monjiviricetes
Order: Mononegavirales
Family: Filoviridae
Genus: Ebolavirus
Type species
Zaire ebolavirus
Species
Phylogenetic tree comparing ebolaviruses and marburgviruses. Numbers indicate percent confidence of branches.

The genus Ebolavirus (s/ VY-rəs)[1] is a virological taxon included in the family Filoviridae, order Mononegavirales.[1] The members of this genus are called ebolaviruses.[1] The six known virus species are named for the region where each was originally identified: Bundibugyo ebolavirus, Reston ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus, Taï Forest ebolavirus (originally Côte d'Ivoire ebolavirus), Zaire ebolavirus, and Bombali ebolavirus. The last is the most recent species to be named and was isolated from Angolan free-tailed bats in Sierra Leone.[2]

Each species of the genus Ebolavirus has one member virus, and four of these cause Ebola virus disease (EVD) in humans, a type of hemorrhagic fever having a very high case fatality rate. The Reston virus has caused EVD in other primates.[3][4] Zaire ebolavirus is the type species (reference or example species) for Ebolavirus, has the highest mortality rate of the ebolaviruses, and is responsible for the largest number of outbreaks of the six known species of the genus, including the 1976 Zaire outbreak and the outbreak with the most deaths (2014).

Ebolaviruses were first described after outbreaks of EVD in southern Sudan in June 1976 and in Zaire in August 1976.[5][6] The name Ebolavirus is derived from the Ebola River in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo), the location of the 1976 outbreak,[6] and the taxonomic suffix -virus (denoting a viral genus).[1] This genus was introduced in 1998 as the "Ebola-like viruses".[7][8] In 2002, the name was changed to Ebolavirus[9][10] and in 2010, the genus was emended.[1] Ebolaviruses are closely related to marburgviruses.

Other Languages
Alemannisch: Ebolavirus
català: Ebolavirus
Deutsch: Ebolavirus
eesti: Ebolavirus
español: Ebolavirus
français: Ebolavirus
Frysk: Ebolafirus
galego: Ebolavirus
italiano: Ebolavirus
Latina: Ebolavirus
lumbaart: Ebolavirus
Nederlands: Ebolavirus
português: Ebolavirus
română: Ebolavirus
русский: Ebolavirus
slovenčina: Ebolavirus
svenska: Ebolavirus
українська: Ebolavirus