Confirmation in the Catholic Church

For other Christian interpretations of Confirmation, see Confirmation (Christian sacrament).
The Seven Sacraments Altarpiece, by Rogier van der Weyden, depicting a Latin Church bishop administering confirmation in the 14th century

Confirmation is one of the seven sacraments of the Catholic Church. It is the last of four initiation rites for Catholics, the other three being Baptism, Penance, and First Holy Communion. According to Catholic doctrine, in the sacrament of Confirmation, the faithful are sealed with the gift of the Holy Spirit and are strengthened in their Christian life. They often have a sponsor for this sacrament.

Description

The Catechism of the Catholic Church states: [1]

Recall then that you have received the spiritual seal, the Spirit of wisdom and understanding and courage, the spirit of right judgment and courage, the spirit of knowledge and reverence, the Spirit of holy fear in God's presence. Guard what you have received. God our Father has marked you with his sign; Christ the Lord has confirmed you and has placed his pledge, the Spirit, in your heart. [2]

The Catechism of the Catholic Church sees as a scriptural basis for Confirmation as a sacrament distinct from Baptism the account in the 8:14-17: [3] [4]

Now when the apostles, who were in Jerusalem, had heard that Samaria had received the word of God, they sent unto them Peter and John. Who, when they were come down, prayed for them, that they might receive the Holy Ghost. For he was not as yet come upon any of them; but they were only baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. Then they laid their hands upon them, and they received the Holy Ghost.

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