Computer-generated imagery

  • morphogenetic creations computer-generated digital art exhibition by andy lomas at watermans arts centre, west london, in 2016.

    computer-generated imagery (cgi) is the application of computer graphics to create or contribute to images in art, printed media, video games, films, television programs, shorts, commercials, videos, and simulators. the images may be dynamic or static, and may be second-dimension (2d), although the term "cgi" is most commonly used to refer to the 3-d computer graphics used for creating characters, scenes and special effects in films and television, which is described as 'cgi animation'.

    the evolution of cgi led to the emergence of virtual cinematography in the 1990s where the vision of the simulated camera is not constrained by the laws of physics. availability of cgi software and increased computer speeds have allowed individual artists and small companies to produce professional-grade films, games, and fine art from their home computers.[citation needed]

    the term virtual world refers to agent-based, interactive environments, which are now[when?] created with cgi.

  • static images and landscapes
  • architectural scenes
  • anatomical models
  • cloth and skin images
  • interactive simulation and visualization
  • computer animation
  • virtual worlds
  • in courtrooms
  • motion capture
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Morphogenetic Creations computer-generated digital art exhibition by Andy Lomas at Watermans Arts Centre, west London, in 2016.

Computer-Generated Imagery (CGI) is the application of computer graphics to create or contribute to images in art, printed media, video games, films, television programs, shorts, commercials, videos, and simulators. The images may be dynamic or static, and may be second-dimension (2D), although the term "CGI" is most commonly used to refer to the 3-D computer graphics used for creating characters, scenes and special effects in films and television, which is described as 'CGI animation'.

The evolution of CGI led to the emergence of virtual cinematography in the 1990s where the vision of the simulated camera is not constrained by the laws of physics. Availability of CGI software and increased computer speeds have allowed individual artists and small companies to produce professional-grade films, games, and fine art from their home computers.[citation needed]

The term virtual world refers to agent-based, interactive environments, which are now[when?] created with CGI.

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