Common Era

  • common era (ce) is one of the notation systems for the world's most widely used calendar era. bce (before the common era or before the current era) is the era before ce. bce and ce are alternatives to the dionysian bc and ad system respectively. the dionysian era distinguishes eras using ad (anno domini, "in [the] year of [the] lord")[1] and bc ("before christ"). since the two notation systems are numerically equivalent, "2020 ce" corresponds to "ad 2020" and "400 bce" corresponds to "400 bc".[1][2][3][a] both notations refer to the gregorian calendar (and its predecessor, the julian calendar). the year-numbering system used by the gregorian calendar is used throughout the world today, and is an international standard for civil calendars.[4]

    the expression has been traced back to 1615, when it first appeared in a book by johannes kepler as the latin usage annus aerae nostrae vulgaris,[5][6] and to 1635 in english as "vulgar[b] era". the term "common era" can be found in english as early as 1708,[7] and became more widely used in the mid-19th century by jewish religious scholars. in the later 20th century, the use of ce and bce was popularized in academic and scientific publications as a culturally neutral term. it is also used by some authors and publishers who wish to emphasize sensitivity to non-christians by not explicitly referencing jesus as "christ" and dominus ("lord") through use of the abbreviation[c] "ad".[9][10]

  • history
  • contemporary usage
  • rationale
  • conventions in style guides
  • similar conventions in other languages
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • external links

Common Era (CE) is one of the notation systems for the world's most widely used calendar era. BCE (Before the Common Era or Before the Current Era) is the era before CE. BCE and CE are alternatives to the Dionysian BC and AD system respectively. The Dionysian era distinguishes eras using AD (anno Domini, "in [the] year of [the] Lord")[1] and BC ("before Christ"). Since the two notation systems are numerically equivalent, "2020 CE" corresponds to "AD 2020" and "400 BCE" corresponds to "400 BC".[1][2][3][a] Both notations refer to the Gregorian calendar (and its predecessor, the Julian calendar). The year-numbering system used by the Gregorian calendar is used throughout the world today, and is an international standard for civil calendars.[4]

The expression has been traced back to 1615, when it first appeared in a book by Johannes Kepler as the Latin usage annus aerae nostrae vulgaris,[5][6] and to 1635 in English as "Vulgar[b] Era". The term "Common Era" can be found in English as early as 1708,[7] and became more widely used in the mid-19th century by Jewish religious scholars. In the later 20th century, the use of CE and BCE was popularized in academic and scientific publications as a culturally neutral term. It is also used by some authors and publishers who wish to emphasize sensitivity to non-Christians by not explicitly referencing Jesus as "Christ" and Dominus ("Lord") through use of the abbreviation[c] "AD".[9][10]

Other Languages
العربية: حقبة عامة
asturianu: Dómina común
azərbaycanca: Bizim era
беларуская: Наша эра
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Наша эра
català: Era comuna
čeština: Náš letopočet
Deutsch: V. u. Z.
español: Era común
Esperanto: Komuna Erao
euskara: Oraingo Aroa
français: Ère commune
ГӀалгӀай: Вай зама
हिन्दी: आम युग
Bahasa Indonesia: Era Umum
interlingua: Era commun
íslenska: Okkar tímatal
italiano: Era volgare
kernowek: Oos Kemmyn
Lingua Franca Nova: Eda comun
la .lojban.: la cabna cedra
македонски: Наша ера
മലയാളം: കോമൺ ഇറ
日本語: 西暦
norsk nynorsk: Fvt.
occitan: Èra comuna
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Bizning era
polski: Naszej ery
português: Era comum
română: Era comună
русский: Наша эра
Scots: Common Era
සිංහල: පොදු යුගය
Simple English: Common Era
slovenščina: Naše štetje let
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Nova era
தமிழ்: பொது ஊழி
татарча/tatarça: Безнең эра
Türkçe: Milat
українська: Наша ера
粵語: 公元
中文: 公元