Chemical element

  • the periodic table of the chemical elements

    a chemical element is a species of atom having the same number of protons in their atomic nuclei (that is, the same atomic number, or z).[1] for example, the atomic number of oxygen is 8, so the element oxygen describes all atoms which have 8 protons.

    in total, 118 elements have been identified. the first 94 occur naturally on earth, and the remaining 24 are synthetic elements. there are 80 elements that have at least one stable isotope and 38 that have exclusively radionuclides, which decay over time into other elements. iron is the most abundant element (by mass) making up earth, while oxygen is the most common element in the earth's crust.[2]

    chemical elements constitute all of the ordinary matter of the universe. however astronomical observations suggest that ordinary observable matter makes up only about 15% of the matter in the universe. the remainder is dark matter; the composition of this is unknown, but it is not composed of chemical elements.[3] the two lightest elements, hydrogen and helium, were mostly formed in the big bang and are the most common elements in the universe. the next three elements (lithium, beryllium and boron) were formed mostly by cosmic ray spallation, and are thus rarer than heavier elements. formation of elements with 6 to 26 protons occurs in main sequence stars via stellar nucleosynthesis. the high abundance of oxygen, silicon, and iron on earth reflects their common production in such stars. elements with greater than 26 protons are formed by nucleosynthesis in supernovae, which, when they explode, blast these elements as supernova remnants far into space, where they may become incorporated into planets when they are formed.[4]

    the term "element" is used for atoms with a given number of protons (regardless of whether or not they are ionized or chemically bonded, e.g. hydrogen in water) as well as for a pure chemical substance consisting of a single element (e.g. hydrogen gas).[1] for the second meaning, the terms "elementary substance" and "simple substance" have been suggested, but they have not gained much acceptance in english chemical literature, whereas in some other languages their equivalent is widely used (e.g. french corps simple, russian простое вещество). a single element can form multiple substances differing in their structure; they are called allotropes of the element.

    when different elements are chemically combined, with the atoms held together by chemical bonds, they form chemical compounds. only a minority of elements are found uncombined as relatively pure minerals. among the more common of such native elements are copper, silver, gold, carbon (as coal, graphite, or diamonds), and sulfur. all but a few of the most inert elements, such as noble gases and noble metals, are usually found on earth in chemically combined form, as chemical compounds. while about 32 of the chemical elements occur on earth in native uncombined forms, most of these occur as mixtures. for example, atmospheric air is primarily a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon, and native solid elements occur in alloys, such as that of iron and nickel.

    the history of the discovery and use of the elements began with primitive human societies that found native elements like carbon, sulfur, copper and gold (though the status of these materials as elements was not known at the time). later civilizations extracted elemental copper, tin, lead and iron from their ores by smelting, using charcoal. alchemists and chemists subsequently identified many more; all of the naturally occurring elements were known by 1950.

    the properties of the chemical elements are summarized in the periodic table, which organizes the elements by increasing atomic number into rows ("periods") in which the columns ("groups") share recurring ("periodic") physical and chemical properties. save for unstable radioactive elements with short half-lives, all of the elements are available industrially, most of them in low degrees of impurities.

  • description
  • nomenclature and symbols
  • origin of the elements
  • abundance
  • history
  • list of the 118 known chemical elements
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

A chemical element is a species of atom having the same number of protons in their atomic nuclei (that is, the same atomic number, or Z).[1] For example, the atomic number of oxygen is 8, so the element oxygen describes all atoms which have 8 protons.

In total, 118 elements have been identified. The first 94 occur naturally on Earth, and the remaining 24 are synthetic elements. There are 80 elements that have at least one stable isotope and 38 that have exclusively radionuclides, which decay over time into other elements. Iron is the most abundant element (by mass) making up Earth, while oxygen is the most common element in the Earth's crust.[2]

Chemical elements constitute all of the ordinary matter of the universe. However astronomical observations suggest that ordinary observable matter makes up only about 15% of the matter in the universe. The remainder is dark matter; the composition of this is unknown, but it is not composed of chemical elements.[3] The two lightest elements, hydrogen and helium, were mostly formed in the Big Bang and are the most common elements in the universe. The next three elements (lithium, beryllium and boron) were formed mostly by cosmic ray spallation, and are thus rarer than heavier elements. Formation of elements with 6 to 26 protons occurs in main sequence stars via stellar nucleosynthesis. The high abundance of oxygen, silicon, and iron on Earth reflects their common production in such stars. Elements with greater than 26 protons are formed by nucleosynthesis in supernovae, which, when they explode, blast these elements as supernova remnants far into space, where they may become incorporated into planets when they are formed.[4]

The term "element" is used for atoms with a given number of protons (regardless of whether or not they are ionized or chemically bonded, e.g. hydrogen in water) as well as for a pure chemical substance consisting of a single element (e.g. hydrogen gas).[1] For the second meaning, the terms "elementary substance" and "simple substance" have been suggested, but they have not gained much acceptance in English chemical literature, whereas in some other languages their equivalent is widely used (e.g. French corps simple, Russian простое вещество). A single element can form multiple substances differing in their structure; they are called allotropes of the element.

When different elements are chemically combined, with the atoms held together by chemical bonds, they form chemical compounds. Only a minority of elements are found uncombined as relatively pure minerals. Among the more common of such native elements are copper, silver, gold, carbon (as coal, graphite, or diamonds), and sulfur. All but a few of the most inert elements, such as noble gases and noble metals, are usually found on Earth in chemically combined form, as chemical compounds. While about 32 of the chemical elements occur on Earth in native uncombined forms, most of these occur as mixtures. For example, atmospheric air is primarily a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, and argon, and native solid elements occur in alloys, such as that of iron and nickel.

The history of the discovery and use of the elements began with primitive human societies that found native elements like carbon, sulfur, copper and gold (though the status of these materials as elements was not known at the time). Later civilizations extracted elemental copper, tin, lead and iron from their ores by smelting, using charcoal. Alchemists and chemists subsequently identified many more; all of the naturally occurring elements were known by 1950.

The properties of the chemical elements are summarized in the periodic table, which organizes the elements by increasing atomic number into rows ("periods") in which the columns ("groups") share recurring ("periodic") physical and chemical properties. Save for unstable radioactive elements with short half-lives, all of the elements are available industrially, most of them in low degrees of impurities.

Other Languages
Acèh: Drah kimia
Afrikaans: Chemiese element
Alemannisch: Chemisches Element
አማርኛ: ንጥረ ነገር
Ænglisc: Hēafodgesceaft
العربية: عنصر كيميائي
aragonés: Elemento quimico
Արեւմտահայերէն: Քիմիական Տարրեր
azərbaycanca: Kimyəvi element
Bân-lâm-gú: Hòa-ha̍k goân-sò͘
башҡортса: Химик элемент
беларуская: Хімічны элемент
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Хімічны элемэнт
български: Химичен елемент
brezhoneg: Elfenn gimiek
Cebuano: Elemento
čeština: Chemický prvek
Cymraeg: Elfen gemegol
dansk: Grundstof
Esperanto: Kemia elemento
estremeñu: Elementu químicu
Fiji Hindi: Rasaenik element
føroyskt: Frumevni
Gaelg: Bunstoo
贛語: 元素
ગુજરાતી: તત્ત્વ
客家語/Hak-kâ-ngî: Fa-ho̍k ngièn-su
한국어: 원소 (화학)
Bahasa Indonesia: Unsur kimia
interlingua: Elemento chimic
isiXhosa: Ikhemikhali
isiZulu: Ama-elementhi
íslenska: Frumefni
עברית: יסוד כימי
ಕನ್ನಡ: ಮೂಲಧಾತು
Kreyòl ayisyen: Eleman chimik
kriyòl gwiyannen: Éléman chimik
kurdî: Element
Lëtzebuergesch: Element (Chimie)
Lingua Franca Nova: Elementos
la .lojban.: selratni
lumbaart: Element chimich
magyar: Kémiai elem
македонски: Хемиски елемент
മലയാളം: മൂലകം
Bahasa Melayu: Unsur kimia
Minangkabau: Unsur kimia
Mìng-dĕ̤ng-ngṳ̄: Huá-hŏk nguòng-só
မြန်မာဘာသာ: ဒြပ်စင်
Nederlands: Chemisch element
नेपाल भाषा: रसायनिक तत्त्व
日本語: 元素
Norfuk / Pitkern: Kemikill Element
norsk: Grunnstoff
norsk nynorsk: Grunnstoff
Nouormand: Êlément
Novial: Elemente
олык марий: Химий тӱҥлык
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Kimyoviy unsur
ਪੰਜਾਬੀ: ਰਸਾਇਣਕ ਤੱਤ
Papiamentu: Elemento kímiko
ភាសាខ្មែរ: ធាតុគីមី
Piemontèis: Element chìmich
Plattdüütsch: Cheemsch Element
qırımtatarca: Himiyaviy element
română: Element chimic
Runa Simi: Qallawa
русиньскый: Хемічный елемент
саха тыла: Химия элемена
Seeltersk: Element
Simple English: Chemical element
slovenčina: Chemický prvok
slovenščina: Kemični element
Soomaaliga: Curiye kimiko
српски / srpski: Хемијски елемент
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Kemijski element
suomi: Alkuaine
svenska: Grundämne
Tagalog: Elemento
தமிழ்: தனிமம்
Taqbaylit: Aferdis akruran
tarandíne: Elemende chìmeche
татарча/tatarça: Химик элемент
తెలుగు: మూలకము
ไทย: ธาตุ
українська: Хімічний елемент
Tiếng Việt: Nguyên tố hóa học
Volapük: Lömin kiemavik
文言: 化學元素
West-Vlams: Chemisch element
Wolof: Xeet
吴语: 化学元素
粵語: 元素
žemaitėška: Kemėnis elements
中文: 化學元素