Caribbean English

  • part of a series on the
    british
    african-caribbean
    community
    community and subgroups
    • antiguans
    • bajans
    • guyanese
    • grenadians
    • jamaicans
    • kittians and nevisians
    • montserratians
    • saint lucians
    • vincentians
    • trinidadians
    history
    • british rule of the caribbean
    decline and legacy of
    the british empire
    • hmt empire windrush
    languages
    • british english
    • caribbean english
    • multicultural london english
    • creole languages
      • english-based
      • french-based
    culture
    • caribbean music in the uk
    people
    • antiguans
    • bajans
    • dominicans
    • guyanese
    • jamaicans
    • montserratians
    • trinidadians

    caribbean english dialects of the english language are spoken in the caribbean and liberia, most countries on the caribbean coast of central america, and guyana and suriname on the coast of south america. caribbean english is influenced by the english-based creole varieties spoken in the region, but they are not the same. in the caribbean, there is a great deal of variation in the way english is spoken. scholars generally agree that although the dialects themselves vary significantly in each of these countries, they primarily have roots in british english and west african languages. caribbean english in countries with a plurality indian population, such as trinidad and tobago and guyana, has been influenced by hindustani and other south asian languages in addition to british english and west african languages.[1][2][3]

  • overview
  • samples
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Part of a series on the
British
African-Caribbean
community
Community and subgroups
History
Languages
Culture
People

Caribbean English dialects of the English language are spoken in the Caribbean and Liberia, most countries on the Caribbean coast of Central America, and Guyana and Suriname on the coast of South America. Caribbean English is influenced by the English-based Creole varieties spoken in the region, but they are not the same. In the Caribbean, there is a great deal of variation in the way English is spoken. Scholars generally agree that although the dialects themselves vary significantly in each of these countries, they primarily have roots in British English and West African languages. Caribbean English in countries with a plurality Indian population, such as Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana, has been influenced by Hindustani and other South Asian languages in addition to British English and West African languages.[1][2][3]