Canadian English

  • canadian english
    regioncanada
    native speakers
    20.1 million in canada (2016 census)[1]
    about 15 million, c. 7 million of which with french as the l1
    language family
    indo-european
    • germanic
      • west germanic
        • ingvaeonic
          • anglo–frisian
            • english
              • north american english
                • canadian english
    writing system
    latin (english alphabet)
    unified english braille[2]
    language codes
    iso 639-3
    glottolognone
    ietfen-ca[3][4]
    this article contains ipa phonetic symbols. without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of unicode characters. for an introductory guide on ipa symbols, see help:ipa.

    canadian english (cane, ce, en-ca)[5] is the set of varieties of the english language native to canada. according to the 2016 census, english was the first language of more than 19.4 million canadians, or 58.1% of the total population; the remainder of the population were native speakers of canadian french (20.8%) or other languages (21.1%).[6] a larger number, 28 million people, reported using english as their dominant language.[7] of canadians outside the province of quebec, 82% reported speaking english natively, but within quebec the figure was just 7.7% as most of its residents are native speakers of quebec french.[8]

    canadian english contains major elements of both british english and american english, as well as many uniquely canadian characteristics.[9] while, broadly speaking, canadian english tends to be closest to american english in terms of linguistic distance,[10][11] the precise influence of american english, british english and other sources on canadian english varieties has been the ongoing focus of systematic studies since the 1950s.[12]

    phonologically, canadian and american english are classified together as north american english, emphasizing the fact that the vast majority of outsiders, even other native english speakers, cannot distinguish the typical accents of the two countries by sound alone. there are minor disagreements over the degree to which even canadians and americans themselves can differentiate their own two accents,[13][14] and there is even evidence that some western american english (pacific northwest and california english, for example) is undergoing a vowel shift partially coinciding with a vowel shift occurring in mainland canadian english, first reported in the early 1990s.[15]

  • history
  • historical linguistics
  • spelling tendencies
  • dictionaries
  • phonology and phonetics
  • grammar
  • vocabulary
  • attitudes towards canadian english
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Canadian English
RegionCanada
Native speakers
20.1 million in Canada (2016 census)[1]
about 15 million, c. 7 million of which with French as the L1
Latin (English alphabet)
Unified English Braille[2]
Language codes
ISO 639-3
GlottologNone
IETFen-CA[3][4]
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

Canadian English (CanE, CE, en-CA)[5] is the set of varieties of the English language native to Canada. According to the 2016 census, English was the first language of more than 19.4 million Canadians, or 58.1% of the total population; the remainder of the population were native speakers of Canadian French (20.8%) or other languages (21.1%).[6] A larger number, 28 million people, reported using English as their dominant language.[7] Of Canadians outside the province of Quebec, 82% reported speaking English natively, but within Quebec the figure was just 7.7% as most of its residents are native speakers of Quebec French.[8]

Canadian English contains major elements of both British English and American English, as well as many uniquely Canadian characteristics.[9] While, broadly speaking, Canadian English tends to be closest to American English in terms of linguistic distance,[10][11] the precise influence of American English, British English and other sources on Canadian English varieties has been the ongoing focus of systematic studies since the 1950s.[12]

Phonologically, Canadian and American English are classified together as North American English, emphasizing the fact that the vast majority of outsiders, even other native English speakers, cannot distinguish the typical accents of the two countries by sound alone. There are minor disagreements over the degree to which even Canadians and Americans themselves can differentiate their own two accents,[13][14] and there is even evidence that some Western American English (Pacific Northwest and California English, for example) is undergoing a vowel shift partially coinciding with a vowel shift occurring in mainland Canadian English, first reported in the early 1990s.[15]

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