Bologna

Bologna
Comune
Comune di Bologna
Clockwise from top: panorama of Bologna and the surrounding hills, San Petronio Basilica, University of Bologna, Fountain of Neptune, Sanctuary of the Madonna di San Luca, Unipol Tower and the Two Towers
Clockwise from top: panorama of Bologna and the surrounding hills, San Petronio Basilica, University of Bologna, Fountain of Neptune, Sanctuary of the Madonna di San Luca, Unipol Tower and the Two Towers
Flag of Bologna
Flag
Coat of arms of Bologna
Coat of arms
Nickname(s): The Learned One, the Fat One, the Red One
Bologna is located in Emilia-Romagna
Bologna
Bologna
Location of Bologna in Emilia-Romagna
Bologna is located in Italy
Bologna
Bologna
Bologna (Italy)
Bologna is located in Europe
Bologna
Bologna
Bologna (Europe)
Coordinates: 44°30′27″N 11°21′5″E / 44°30′27″N 11°21′5″E / 44.50750; 11.35139
CountryItaly
RegionEmilia-Romagna
Metropolitan cityBologna (BO)
Government
 • MayorVirginio Merola (PD)
Area[1]
 • Total140.86 km2 (54.39 sq mi)
Elevation54 m (177 ft)
Population (27 July 2018)[2]
 • Total390,198 (urban)
1,010,389 (metro)
Demonym(s)Bolognesi
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code40100
Dialing code051
ISTAT code037006
Patron saintSt. Petronius
Saint day4 October
WebsiteOfficial website

Bologna (ə/, also UK: ə/; Italian: [boˈloɲːa] (About this sound listen); Emilian: Bulåggna [buˈlʌɲːa]; Latin: Bononia) is the capital and largest city of the Emilia-Romagna Region in Northern Italy. It is the seventh most populous city in Italy, at the heart of a metropolitan area of about one million people.

Of Etruscan origin, the city has been a major urban centre for centuries, first under the Etruscans, then under the Romans (Bononia), then again in the Middle Ages, as a free municipality and signoria, when it was among the largest European cities by population. Famous for its towers, churches and lengthy porticoes, Bologna has a well-preserved historical centre, thanks to a careful restoration and conservation policy which began at the end of the 1970s.[3] Home to the oldest university in the world,[4][5][6][7][8] the University of Bologna, established in AD 1088, the city has a large student population that gives it a cosmopolitan character. In 2000 it was declared European capital of culture[9] and in 2006, a UNESCO "City of Music" and became part of the Creative Cities Network.[10]

Bologna is an important agricultural, industrial, financial and transport hub, where many large mechanical, electronic and food companies have their headquarters as well as one of the largest permanent trade fairs in Europe. According to the most recent data gathered by the European Regional Economic Growth Index (E-REGI) of 2009, Bologna is the first Italian city and the 47th European city in terms of its economic growth rate.[11] As a consequence, Bologna is also one of the wealthiest cities in Italy, often ranking as one of the top cities in terms of quality of life in the country: in 2011 it ranked 1st out of 107 Italian cities.[12]

History

Antiquity and Middle Ages

The iconic Due Torri.
Porta Maggiore, one of the twelve medieval city gates of Bologna.
Depiction of a 14th-century fight between the Guelf and Ghibelline factions in Bologna, from the Croniche of Giovanni Sercambi of Lucca.

First settled around 1000 BCE and then founded as the Etruscan Felsina about 500 BCE, it was occupied by the Boii in the 4th century BCE and became a Roman colony and municipium with the name of Bononia in 196 BCE.[13] After the fall of the Roman Empire, Bologna, then a frontier outpost of the Byzantine Exarchate of Ravenna was repeatedly sacked by the Goths; it is in this period that legendary Bishop Petronius, according to ancient chronicles, rebuilt the ruined town and founded the basilica of Saint Stephen.[14] Petronius is still revered as patron saint of Bologna.

In 727-28, the city was sacked and captured by the Lombard under King Liutprand, becoming part of that kingdom. These Germanic conquerors built an important new quarter, called "addizione longobarda" (Italian for "Longobard addition") near the complex of St. Stephen.[15] In the last quarter of the 8th century, Charlemagne, at the request of Pope Adrian I, invaded the Lombard Kingdom, causing its eventual demise. However Bologna, occupied by Frankish troops in 774 on behalf of the papacy, remained under imperial authority and prospered as a frontier mark of the Carolingian empire.[16]

After the death of Matilda of Tuscany in 1115, Bologna obtained substantial concessions from Emperor Henry V. However, when Frederick Barbarossa subsequently attempted to strike down the deal, Bologna joined the Lombard League, which then defeated the imperial armies at the Battle of Legnano and established an effective autonomy at the Peace of Constance in 1183. Subsequently, the town began to expand rapidly and it became one of the main commercial trade centres of northern Italy thanks to a system of canals that allowed barges and ships to come and go.[17] Believed to have been established in 1088, the University of Bologna is widely considered the oldest university in continuous operation.[7][8] The university originated as a centre for the study of medieval Roman law under major glossators, including Irnerius. It numbered Dante, Boccaccio and Petrarca among its students.[18] The medical school was especially renowned.[19] By 1200, Bologna was a thriving commercial and artisanal centre of about 10,000 people.[20]

During a campaign to support the imperial cities of Modena and Cremona against Bologna, Frederick II's son, King Enzo of Sardinia, was defeated and captured on 26 May 1249 at the Battle of Fossalta. Though the emperor demanded his release, Enzo was thenceforth kept a knightly prisoner in Bologna, in a palace that came to be named Palazzo Re Enzo after him. Every attempt to escape or to rescue him failed, and he died after more than 22 years in captivity.[21] After the death of his half-brothers Conrad IV in 1254, Frederick of Antioch in 1256 and Manfred in 1266, as well as the execution his nephew Conradin in 1268, he was the last of the Hohenstaufen heirs.

During the late 1200s, Bologna was affected by political instability when the most prominent families incessantly fought for the control of the town. The free commune was severely weakened by decades of infighting, allowing the Pope to impose the rule of his envoy Cardinal Bertrand du Pouget in 1327. Du Pouget was eventually ousted by a popular rebellion and Bologna became a signoria under Taddeo Pepoli in 1334.[22] By the arrival of the Black Death in 1348, Bologna had 40-50,000 inhabitants, reduced to just 20-25,000 after the plague.[23]

In 1350 Bologna was conquered by Archbishop Giovanni Visconti, the new lord of Milan. However, following a rebellion by the town's governor, a renegade member of the Visconti family, Bologna was recuperated to the papacy in 1363 by Cardinal Gil Álvarez Carrillo de Albornoz after a long negotiation involving a huge indemnity paid to Bernabò Visconti (the heir to Giovanni, died in 1354).[22] In 1376, Bologna again revolted against Papal rule and joined Florence in the unsuccessful War of the Eight Saints. However, extreme infighting inside the Holy See following the Western Schism prevented the papacy from restoring its domination over Bologna so that she remained relatively independent for some decades as an oligarchic republic. In 1401 Giovanni I Bentivoglio took power by a coup with the support of Milan but, having turned his back on them and allied with Florence, the Milanese marched on Bologna and had him killed the following year. In 1442 Hannibal I Bentivoglio, nephew of Giovanni, recovered Bologna from the Milanese, only to be assassinated in a conspiracy plotted by Pope Eugene IV three years later. But the signoria of the Bentivoglio family was then firmly established, and the power passed to his cousin Sante Bentivoglio who ruled until 1462, followed by Giovanni II. Giovanni II managed to resist the expansionist designs of Cesare Borgia for some time, but on 7 October 1506, Pope Julius II issued a bull deposing and excommunicating Bentivoglio and placing the city under interdict. When the papal troops, along with a contingent sent by Louis XII of France, marched against Bologna, Bentivoglio and his family fled. Julius II entered the city triumphantly on 10 November.

Early modern

Bologna in 1640.

The period of Papal rule over Bologna has been generally evalued by historians as one of severe decline. However, this was not evident in the 1500s that were in fact marked by some major developments in Bologna. In 1530, Emperor Charles V was crowned in Bologna. In 1564, the Piazza del Nettuno and the Palazzo dei Banchi were built, along with the Archiginnasio, the main building of the university. The period of Papal rule saw also the construction of many churches and other religious establishments, and the restoration of older ones. At this time, Bologna had ninety-six convents, more than any other Italian city. Painters working in Bologna during this period established the Bolognese School which includes Annibale Carracci, Domenichino, Guercino and others of European fame.[24]

In the 17th century, the economy of Bologna started to show signs of severe decline as the global centres of trade shifted towards the Atlantic. During the Italian Plague of 1629–31 Bologna lost up to a third of its population.[25] The traditional silk industry was in a critical state.[26] The university was losing students, that once came from all over Europe, because of the illiberal attitudes of the Church towards culture (especially after the trial of Galileo).[27] Bologna continued to suffer a progressive deindustrialisation also in the 18th century.[28]

In the mid-1700s pope Benedict XIV, a Bolognese, tried to reverse the decline of the city with a series of reforms intended to stimulate the economy and promoting the arts. However, these reforms achieved only mixed results. The pope's efforts to stimulate the decaying textile industry had little success, while he was more successful in reforming the tax system and liberalising trade[29] and relaxed the oppressive system of censorship.[30]

The economic and demographic decline of Bologna became even more noticeable starting from the second half of the 18th century. In 1790 the city had 72,000 inhabitants, ranking as the second largest in the Papal States; however this figure had remained unchanged for decades. The economy was stagnant because of Papal policies that distorted trade with heavy custom dues and sold concessions of monopolies to single manufacturers thus lowering competition, depressing productivity and incentivising corruption.[31]

Late modern and contemporary

Piazza del Nettuno in 1855, looking towards Piazza Maggiore.

In 1796 Napoleon entered Bologna, making it the capital of the short lived Cispadane Republic, a client state of the French Empire. After the fall of Napoleon, the Congress of Vienna of 1815 placed Bologna once again under the oppressive rule of the Papal States, leading to the unsuccessful uprisings of 1831. By the mid 1840s, unemployment levels were very high and traditional industries continued to languish or disappear; Bologna became a city of economic disparity with the top 10 percent of the population living of rent, another 20 percent exercising professions or commerce and 70 percent working in low-paid, often insecure manual jobs. The Papal census of 1841 reported 10,000 permanent beggars and another 30,000 (out of a total population of 70,000) who lived in poverty.[32] In the revolutions of 1848 the Austrian garrisons which controlled the city on behalf of the Pope were temporarily expelled, but eventually came back and crashed the revolutionaries. Finally, in the aftermath of Second War of Italian Independence, when the French and Pidemontese troops expelled the Austrians from Italian lands, on 11 and 12 March 1860 Bologna voted for joining the new Kingdom of Italy.

In the last decades of the 19th century, Bologna once again thrived economically and socially. In 1863 Naples was linked to Rome by railway, and the following year Bologna to Florence.[33] Bolognese moderate agrarian elites, that supported liberal insurgencies against the papacy and were admirers of the British political system and of free trade, envisioned a unified national state that would open a bigger market for the massive agricultural production of the Emilian plains.[34] Indeed, Bologna gave Italy one of its first prime ministers, Marco Minghetti.

After World War I, Bologna was heavily involved in the Biennio Rosso socialist uprisings. As a consequence, the traditionally moderate elites of the city turned their back on the progressive faction and gave their support to the rising Fascist movement of Benito Mussolini.[35] Dino Grandi, a high-ranking Fascist party official and Ministry of Foreign Affairs, remembered for being an Anglophile, was from Bologna. During the interwar years, Bologna developed into an important manufacturing centre for food processing, agricultural machinery and metalworking. The Fascist regime poured in massive investments, for example with the setting up of a giant tobacco manufacturing plant in 1937.[36]

World War II

Bologna suffered extensive damage during World War II. The strategic importance of the city as an industrial and railway hub connecting northern and central Italy made it a strategic target for the Allied forces. On 24 July 1943, a massive aerial bombardment destroyed a significant part of the historic city centre and killed about 200 people. The main railway station and adjoining areas were severely hit, and 44% of the buildings in the centre were listed as having been destroyed or severely damaged. The city was heavily bombed again on 25 September. The raids, which this time were not confined to the city centre, left more than 1,000 people dead and thousands injured.[37]

After the armistice of 1943, the city became a key centre of the Italian resistance movement. On 7 November 1944, a pitched battle around Porta Lame, waged by partisans of the 7th Brigade of the Gruppi d'Azione Patriottica against Fascist and Nazi occupation forces, did not succeed in triggering a general uprising, despite being one of the largest resistance-led urban conflicts in the European theatre.[38] Resistance forces entered Bologna on the morning of 21 April 1945. By this time, the Germans had already largely left the city in the face of the Allied advance, spearheaded by Polish forces advancing from the east during the Battle of Bologna which had been fought since 9 April. First to arrive in the centre was the 87th Infantry Regiment of the Friuli Combat Group under general Arturo Scattini, who entered the centre from Porta Maggiore to the south. Since the soldiers were dressed in British outfits, they were initially thought to be part of the allied forces; when the local inhabitants heard the soldiers were speaking Italian, they poured out on to the streets to celebrate.[citation needed]

Post-war years

Aftermath of the 1980 terrorist bombing.

In the post-war years, Bologna became a thriving industrial centre as well as a political stronghold of the Italian Communist Party. Between 1945 and 1999, the city had an uninterrupted series of left-wing mayors, the first of whom was Giuseppe Dozza. At the end of the 1960s the city authorities, worried by massive gentrification and suburbanisation, asked Japanese archistar Kenzo Tange to sketch a master plan for a new town north of Bologna; however, the project that came out in 1970 was evaluated as way too much ambitious and expensive.[39] Eventually the city council, in spite of vetoing Tange's master plan, decided to keep his project for a new exhibition centre and business district.[40] At the end of 1978 the construction of a tower block and several diverse buildings and structures started.[41] In 1985 the headquarters of the regional government of Emilia-Romagna moved in the new district.[42]

In 1977 Bologna was the scene of rioting linked to the Movement of 1977, a spontaneous political movement of the time. The alleged police shooting of a far-left activist, Francesco Lorusso, sparked two days of street clashes. On 2 August 1980, at the height of the "years of lead", a terrorist bomb was set off in the central railway station of Bologna killing 85 people and wounding 200, an event which is known in Italy as the Bologna massacre. In 1995, members of the neo-fascist group Nuclei Armati Rivoluzionari were convicted for carrying out the attack, while Licio Gelli—Grand Master of the underground Freemason lodge Propaganda Due (P2)—was convicted for hampering the investigation, together with three agents of the secret military intelligence service SISMI (including Francesco Pazienza and Pietro Musumeci). Commemorations take place in Bologna on 2 August each year, culminating in a concert in the main square.

In 1999 the long tradition of left-wing mayors was interrupted by the victory of the independent candidate Giorgio Guazzaloca, who led a centre-right coalition; this brief experience ended in 2004 when Sergio Cofferati, a former trade union leader, was elected. The next centre-left mayor, Flavio Delbono, elected in June 2009, resigned in January 2010 after being involved in a corruption scandal. After a 15-month period in which the city was administered under Anna Maria Cancellieri (as a state-appointed prefect), Virginio Merola was elected as mayor, leading a left-wing coalition comprising the Democratic Party, Left Ecology Freedom and Italy of Values.[43]

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Bologna
Alemannisch: Bologna
አማርኛ: ቦሎኛ
aragonés: Bolonia
asturianu: Boloña
Aymar aru: Bologna
azərbaycanca: Bolonya
تۆرکجه: بولونیا
Bân-lâm-gú: Bologna
беларуская: Балоння
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Балёньня
български: Болоня
bosanski: Bologna
brezhoneg: Bologna
català: Bolonya
Cebuano: Bolonia
čeština: Bologna
corsu: Bologna
Cymraeg: Bologna
dansk: Bologna
Deutsch: Bologna
eesti: Bologna
Ελληνικά: Μπολόνια
emiliàn e rumagnòl: Bulåggna
español: Bolonia
Esperanto: Bolonjo
estremeñu: Boloña
euskara: Bolonia
فارسی: بولونیا
français: Bologne
furlan: Bologne
Gaeilge: Bologna
Gàidhlig: Bologna
galego: Boloña
한국어: 볼로냐
հայերեն: Բոլոնյա
hornjoserbsce: Bologna
hrvatski: Bologna
Ido: Bologna
Bahasa Indonesia: Bologna
interlingua: Bolonia
Interlingue: Bologna
Ирон: Болонья
íslenska: Bologna
italiano: Bologna
עברית: בולוניה
Basa Jawa: Bologna
ქართული: ბოლონია
қазақша: Болонья
Kiswahili: Bologna
коми: Болонья
Кыргызча: Болонья
Latina: Bononia
latviešu: Boloņa
Lëtzebuergesch: Bologna
lietuvių: Bolonija
Ligure: Bologna
lumbaart: Bologna
magyar: Bologna
македонски: Болоња
Malti: Bolonja
मराठी: बोलोन्या
Bahasa Melayu: Bologna
မြန်မာဘာသာ: ဘိုလိုညာမြို့
Nederlands: Bologna (stad)
日本語: ボローニャ
Napulitano: Bologna
нохчийн: Болонья
Nordfriisk: Bologna
norsk: Bologna
norsk nynorsk: Bologna
occitan: Bolonha
oʻzbekcha/ўзбекча: Bolonya
پنجابی: بولونا
Papiamentu: Bologna
Piemontèis: Bològna
Plattdüütsch: Bologna
polski: Bolonia
português: Bolonha
română: Bologna
Runa Simi: Bologna
русский: Болонья
संस्कृतम्: बोलोन्या
sardu: Bologna
Scots: Bologna
shqip: Bolonja
sicilianu: Bulogna
Simple English: Bologna
slovenčina: Bologna
slovenščina: Bologna
ślůnski: Bologna
српски / srpski: Болоња
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Bologna
suomi: Bologna
svenska: Bologna
tarandíne: Bologne
татарча/tatarça: Болонья
тоҷикӣ: Болоня
Türkçe: Bologna
Twi: Bologna
українська: Болонья
اردو: بولونیا
vèneto: Bułogna
Tiếng Việt: Bologna
Volapük: Bologna
Winaray: Bologna
吴语: 博洛尼亚
粵語: 博洛尼亞
中文: 博洛尼亚