Belfast City Hall

Belfast City Hall
Belfast City Hall 2.jpg
Belfast City Hall
General information
Architectural styleBaroque Revival
LocationDonegall Square
Town or cityBelfast
CountryNorthern Ireland
Coordinates54°35′47″N 5°55′48″W / 54°35′47″N 5°55′48″W / 54.59639; -5.93000
Current tenantsBelfast City Council
Construction started1898
Completed1906
Renovated2009
CostApprox £360,000[1]
ClientBelfast Corporation
HeightRoof – 174 feet (53 m)
Design and construction
ArchitectAlfred Brumwell Thomas
Quantity surveyorWH Stephens
Main contractorH&J Martin

Belfast City Hall (Irish: Halla na Cathrach Bhéal Feirste; Ulster-Scots: Bilfawst Citie Haw) is the civic building of Belfast City Council located in Donegall Square, Belfast, Northern Ireland. It faces North and effectively divides the commercial and business areas of the city centre.

History

A black and white photograph, showing a stately-looking two-storey building with white walls, extending out of shot to the left and right, with an arched cart entrance at the centre. A modest clocktower rises above the entrance, and the building is surrounded by neat shrubbery and iron railings. A wide street crosses left-right outside of the fence, with a handful of horse-drawn carts and pedestrians in 19th century clothing.
The White Linen Hall, or the Linen Hall Library as it was in 1888. Now replaced by the City Hall.

The site now occupied by Belfast City Hall was once the home of the White Linen Hall, an important international Linen Exchange. The street that runs from the back door of Belfast City Hall through the middle of Linen Quarter is Linen Hall Street.[2]

Plans for the City Hall began in 1888 when Belfast was awarded city status by Queen Victoria. This was in recognition of Belfast's rapid expansion and thriving linen, rope-making, shipbuilding and engineering industries. During this period Belfast briefly overtook Dublin as the most populous city in Ireland.[3]

Construction began in 1898 under the supervision of architect Sir Alfred Brumwell Thomas and was completed in 1906 at a cost of £369,000. Belfast Corporation, now the council, its their profits from the gas industry to pay for the construction of the Belfast City Hall. Local firms H&J Martin and WH Stephens were among the companies involved in the construction. James G. Gamble, architect, was the clerk of works.

The city hall in Durban, South Africa is almost an exact replica of Belfast's City Hall.[4] It was built in 1910 and designed by Stanley G. Hudson, who was inspired by the Belfast design. The Port of Liverpool Building, designed by Arnold Thornley and completed in 1913, is another very close relative.[5]

On 1 August 2006 the City Hall celebrated its centenary with a "Century of Memories" exhibition and family picnic day.[6]

On 3 December 2012, the City Council voted to limit the days that the Union Flag flies from City Hall to no more than 18 designated days. Since 1906, the flag had been flown every day of the year. The move was backed by the Council's Irish nationalist Councillors and by its Alliance Party Councillors. It was opposed by the unionist Councillors, who had enjoyed a majority on the council until the Northern Ireland local elections of 2011. On the night of the vote, unionist and loyalist protesters tried to storm the City Hall. They held protests throughout Northern Ireland, some of which became violent.[7]