Bath, Somerset

Bath
Aerial view of Bath City centre
Bath City Centre
Map of Somerset, with a red dot showing the position of Bath in the north east corner
Map of Somerset, with a red dot showing the position of Bath in the north east corner
Bath
Bath shown within Somerset
Population88,859 [1]
DemonymBathonian
OS grid referenceST750645
• London97 miles (156 km) E
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townBATH
Postcode districtBA1, BA2
Dialling code01225
PoliceAvon and Somerset
FireAvon
AmbulanceSouth Western
EU ParliamentSouth West England
UK Parliament
UNESCO World Heritage Site
Official nameCity of Bath
CriteriaCultural: i, ii, iv
Reference428
Inscription1987 (11th Session)
Area2,900 ha
List of places
UK
England
Somerset
51°23′N 2°22′W / 51°23′N 2°22′W / 51.38; -2.36

Bath is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England, known for its Roman-built baths. In 2011, the population was 88,859.[2] Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London and 11 miles (18 km) south-east of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage Site in 1987.

The city became a spa with the Latin name Aquae Sulis ("the waters of Sulis") c. 60 AD when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon, although hot springs were known even before then.

Bath Abbey was founded in the 7th century and became a religious centre; the building was rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries. In the 17th century, claims were made for the curative properties of water from the springs, and Bath became popular as a spa town in the Georgian era. Georgian architecture, crafted from Bath stone, includes the Royal Crescent, Circus, Pump Room and Assembly Rooms where Beau Nash presided over the city's social life from 1705 until his death in 1761. Many of the streets and squares were laid out by John Wood, the Elder, and in the 18th century the city became fashionable and the population grew. Jane Austen lived in Bath in the early 19th century. Further building was undertaken in the 19th century and following the Bath Blitz in World War II.

The city has software, publishing and service-oriented industries. Theatres, museums and other cultural and sporting venues have helped make it a major centre for tourism, with more than one million staying visitors and 3.8 million day visitors to the city each year.

There are several museums including the Museum of Bath Architecture, the Victoria Art Gallery, the Museum of East Asian Art, the Herschel Museum of Astronomy and the Holburne Museum. The city has two universities – the University of Bath and Bath Spa University – with Bath College providing further education. Sporting clubs include Bath Rugby and Bath City F.C. while TeamBath is the umbrella name for all of the University of Bath sports teams.

Bath became part of the county of Avon in 1974, and, following Avon's abolition in 1996, has been the principal centre of Bath and North East Somerset.

History

Iron Age and Roman

A late-nineteenth-century Photochrom of the Great Bath at the Roman Baths. Pillars tower over the water, and the spires of Bath Abbey – restored in the early sixteenth century – are visible in the background.
19th century Photochrom of the Great Bath at the Roman Baths. The entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later construction and was not a feature of the building in Roman days.

The hills in the locality such as Bathampton Down saw human activity from the Mesolithic period.[3][4] Several Bronze Age round barrows were opened by John Skinner in the 18th century.[5] Solsbury Hill overlooking the current city was an Iron Age hill fort, and the adjacent Bathampton Camp may also have been one.[6][7] A long barrow site believed to be from the Beaker people was flattened to make way for RAF Charmy Down.[8][9]

Archaeological evidence shows that the site of the Roman baths' main spring may have been treated as a shrine by the Britons,[10][11] and was dedicated to the goddess Sulis, whom the Romans identified with Minerva; the name Sulis continued to be used after the Roman invasion, appearing in the town's Roman name, Aquae Sulis (literally, "the waters of Sulis").[12] Messages to her scratched onto metal, known as curse tablets, have been recovered from the sacred spring by archaeologists.[13] The tablets were written in Latin, and cursed people whom the writers felt had wronged them. For example, if a citizen had his clothes stolen at the baths, he might write a curse, naming the suspects, on a tablet to be read by the goddess.

A temple was constructed in AD 60–70, and a bathing complex was built up over the next 300 years.[14] Engineers drove oak piles into the mud to provide a stable foundation, and surrounded the spring with an irregular stone chamber lined with lead. In the 2nd century, the spring was enclosed within a wooden barrel-vaulted structure that housed the caldarium (hot bath), tepidarium (warm bath), and frigidarium (cold bath).[15]

The town was later given defensive walls, probably in the 3rd century.[16] After the failure of Roman authority in the first decade of the 5th century, the baths fell into disrepair and were eventually lost as a result of rising water levels and silting.[17]

In March 2012 a hoard of 30,000 silver Roman coins, one of the largest discovered in Britain, was unearthed in an archaeological dig. The coins, believed to date from the 3rd century, were found about 150 m (450 ft) from the Roman baths.[18]

Post-Roman and Medieval

Bath may have been the site of the Battle of Badon (c.500  AD ), in which King Arthur is said to have defeated the Anglo-Saxons.[19] The town was captured by the West Saxons in 577 after the Battle of Deorham;[20][20] the Anglo-Saxon poem The Ruin may describe the appearance of the Roman site about this time.[21] A monastery was founded at an early date – reputedly by Saint David although more probably in 675 by Osric, King of the Hwicce,[22] perhaps using the walled area as its precinct.[23][24] Nennius, a 9th-century historian, mentions a "Hot Lake" in the land of the Hwicce along the River Severn, and adds "It is surrounded by a wall, made of brick and stone, and men may go there to bathe at any time, and every man can have the kind of bath he likes. If he wants, it will be a cold bath; and if he wants a hot bath, it will be hot". Bede described hot baths in the geographical introduction to the Ecclesiastical History in terms very similar to those of Nennius.[25] King Offa of Mercia gained control of the monastery in 781 and rebuilt the church, which was dedicated to St. Peter.[26]

Map of Bath by John Speed published in 1610

By the 9th century the old Roman street pattern was lost and Bath was a royal possession. King Alfred laid out the town afresh, leaving its south-eastern quadrant as the abbey precinct.[16] In the Burghal Hidage, Bath is recorded as a burh (borough) and is described as having walls of 1,375 yards (1,257 m) and was allocated 1000 men for defence.[27] During the reign of Edward the Elder coins were minted in Bath based on a design from the Winchester mint but with 'BAD' on the obverse relating to the Anglo-Saxon name for the town, Baðum, Baðan or Baðon, meaning "at the baths",[28] and this was the source of the present name. Edgar of England was crowned king of England in Bath Abbey in 973, in a ceremony that formed the basis of all future English coronations.[29]

William Rufus granted the town, abbey and mint to a royal physician, John of Tours, who became Bishop of Wells and Abbot of Bath,[30][31] following the sacking of the town during the Rebellion of 1088.[32] It was papal policy for bishops to move to more urban seats, and John of Tours translated his own from Wells to Bath.[33] The bishop planned and began a much larger church as his cathedral, to which was attached a priory, with the bishop's palace beside it.[34] New baths were built around the three springs. Later bishops returned the episcopal seat to Wells while retaining the name Bath in the title, Bishop of Bath and Wells. St John's Hospital was founded around 1180 by Bishop Reginald Fitz Jocelin and is among the oldest almshouses in England.[35] The 'hospital of the baths' was built beside the hot springs of the Cross Bath, for their health-giving properties and to provide shelter for the poor infirm.[36]

Administrative systems fell within the hundreds. The Bath Hundred had various names including the Hundred of Le Buri. The Bath Foreign Hundred or Forinsecum covered the area outside the city and was later combined into the Bath Forum Hundred. Wealthy merchants had no status within the hundred courts and formed guilds to gain influence. They built the first guildhall probably in the 13th century. Around 1200 the first mayor was appointed.[37]

Early Modern

By the 15th century, Bath's abbey church was dilapidated[38] and Oliver King, Bishop of Bath and Wells, decided to rebuild it on a smaller scale in 1500. The new church was completed just a few years before Bath Priory was dissolved in 1539 by Henry VIII.[39] The abbey church became derelict before being restored as the city's parish church in the Elizabethan era, when the city experienced a revival as a spa. The baths were improved and the city began to attract the aristocracy. A Royal charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I in 1590 confirmed city status.[40]

During the English Civil War, the city was garrisoned for Charles I. Seven thousand pounds was spent on fortifications, but on the appearance of parliamentary forces the gates were thrown open and the city surrendered. It became a significant post for the New Model Army under William Waller.[41] Bath was retaken by royalists following the Battle of Lansdowne fought on the northern outskirts of the city on 5 July 1643.[42] Thomas Guidott, a student of chemistry and medicine at Wadham College, Oxford, set up a practice in the city in 1668. He was interested in the curative properties of the waters, and he wrote A discourse of Bathe, and the hot waters there. Also, Some Enquiries into the Nature of the water in 1676. It brought the health-giving properties of the hot mineral waters to the attention of the country, and the aristocracy arrived to partake in them.[43]

Aerial photograph of semicircular terrace of stone buildings with large expanse of grass in front and to the left. Also shows surrounding terraces of buildings.
Royal Crescent and Circus from the air (connected by link road, thus creating the famous "question mark" formation). Georgian taste favoured the regularity of Bath's streets and squares and the contrast with adjacent rural nature.

Several areas of the city were developed in the Stuart period, and more building took place during Georgian times in response to the increasing number of visitors who required accommodation.[44] Architects John Wood the Elder and his son laid out the new quarters in streets and squares, the identical façades of which gave an impression of palatial scale and classical decorum.[45] Much of the creamy gold Bath stone, a type of limestone used for construction in the city, was obtained from the Combe Down and Bathampton Down Mines owned by Ralph Allen (1694–1764).[46] Allen, to advertise the quality of his quarried limestone, commissioned the elder John Wood to build a country house on his Prior Park estate between the city and the mines.[46] Allen was responsible for improving and expanding the postal service in western England, for which he held the contract for more than forty years.[46] Although not fond of politics, Allen was a civic-minded man and a member of Bath Corporation for many years. He was elected mayor for a single term in 1742.[46]

In the early 18th century, Bath acquired its first purpose-built theatre, the Old Orchard Street Theatre. It was rebuilt as the Theatre Royal, along with the Grand Pump Room attached to the Roman Baths and assembly rooms. Master of ceremonies Beau Nash, who presided over the city's social life from 1705 until his death in 1761, drew up a code of behaviour for public entertainments.[47] Bath had become perhaps the most fashionable of the rapidly developing British spa towns, attracting many notable visitors such as the wealthy London bookseller Andrew Millar and his wife, who both made long visits.[48] In 1816 it was described as "a seat of amusement and dissipation", where "scenes of extravagance in this receptacle of the wealthy and the idle, the weak and designing" were habitual.[49]

Late Modern

An 1850s photograph of Green Street
Looking north-west from Bathwick Hill towards the northern suburbs, showing the variety of housing typical of Bath

The population of the city was 40,020 at the 1801 census, making it one of the largest cities in Britain.[50] William Thomas Beckford bought a house in Lansdown Crescent in 1822, and subsequently two adjacent houses to form his residence. Having acquired all the land between his home and the top of Lansdown Hill, he created a garden more than 12 mile (800 m) in length and built Beckford's Tower at the top.[51]

Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia spent the four years in exile, from 1936 to 1940, at Fairfield House in Bath.[52] During World War II, between the evening of 25 April and the early morning of 27 April 1942, Bath suffered three air raids in reprisal for RAF raids on the German cities of Lübeck and Rostock, part of the Luftwaffe campaign popularly known as the Baedeker Blitz. During the Bath Blitz, more than 400 people were killed, and more than 19,000 buildings damaged or destroyed.[53] Houses in the Royal Crescent, Circus and Paragon were burnt out along with the Assembly Rooms.[54][55] A 500-kilogram (1,100 lb) high explosive bomb landed on the east side of Queen Square, resulting in houses on the south side being damaged and the Francis Hotel losing 24 metres (79 ft) of its frontage.[54] The buildings have all been restored although there are still signs of the bombing.[54][55]

A postwar review of inadequate housing led to the clearance and redevelopment of areas of the city in a postwar style, often at variance with the local Georgian style. In the 1950s the nearby villages of Combe Down, Twerton and Weston were incorporated into the city to enable the development of housing, much of it council housing. In the 1970s and 1980s it was recognised that conservation of historic buildings was inadequate, leading to more care and reuse of buildings and open spaces.[56] In 1987 the city was selected by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, recognising its international cultural significance.[57]

Since 2000, major developments have included the Thermae Bath Spa, the SouthGate shopping centre, the residential Western Riverside project on the Stothert & Pitt factory site, and the riverside Bath Quays office and business development.[58][59]

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Bath
Ænglisc: Baðanceaster
العربية: باث
ܐܪܡܝܐ: ܒܐܬ
azərbaycanca: Bat
تۆرکجه: باث
беларуская: Бат
беларуская (тарашкевіца)‎: Бат
български: Бат
brezhoneg: Bath (Somerset)
català: Bath
čeština: Bath
Cymraeg: Caerfaddon
dansk: Bath
Deutsch: Bath
eesti: Bath
Ελληνικά: Μπαθ
español: Bath
Esperanto: Bath
euskara: Bath
فارسی: باث
français: Bath
galego: Bath
한국어: 바스
հայերեն: Բաթ (Անգլիա)
hrvatski: Bath, Somerset
Bahasa Indonesia: Bath, Somerset
Interlingue: Bath
íslenska: Bath
italiano: Bath
עברית: באת'
Basa Jawa: Bath
ქართული: ბათი
қазақша: Бат (Англия)
Latina: Aquae Sulis
Lëtzebuergesch: Bath
lietuvių: Batas (Anglija)
lumbaart: Bath
magyar: Bath
македонски: Бат (Самерсет)
მარგალური: ბათი
مازِرونی: باث
Bahasa Melayu: Bath, Somerset
norsk: Bath
norsk nynorsk: Bath
Nouormand: Ba
پنجابی: باتھ
polski: Bath
português: Bath
română: Bath, Somerset
Runa Simi: Bath
русский: Бат (Англия)
Simple English: Bath, Somerset
سنڌي: باٿ شھر
slovenčina: Bath
slovenščina: Bath
کوردی: بات
српски / srpski: Бат (Самерсет)
srpskohrvatski / српскохрватски: Bath
suomi: Bath
svenska: Bath
ไทย: บาธ
Türkçe: Bath
українська: Бат (Англія)
Tiếng Việt: Bath, Somerset
Volapük: Bath (Linglän)
粵語: 巴斯
Zazaki: Bath