Barrister

  • barrister
    artist's rendition of an early 19th-century english barrister
    illustration of an early 19th-century english barrister
    occupation
    occupation type
    profession
    activity sectors
    law
    jurisprudence
    justice
    philosophy of law
    politics
    legal history
    human rights
    intellectual property
    description
    competenciesadvocacy and interpersonal skills, analytical mind, critical thinking, commercial sense
    education required
    england and wales:
    bar professional training course with pupillage (and possibly common professional examination)
    ireland: barrister-at-law degree with pupillage
    fields of
    employment
    barristers' chambers, government, sole trader
    related jobs
    pupil barrister, advocate, judge, magistrate, attorney, solicitor

    a barrister is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions. barristers mostly specialise in courtroom advocacy and litigation. their tasks include taking cases in superior courts and tribunals, drafting legal pleadings, researching the philosophy, hypothesis and history of law, and giving expert legal opinions.

    barristers are distinguished from solicitors, who have more direct access to clients, and may do transactional-type legal work. it is mainly barristers who are appointed as judges, and they are rarely hired by clients directly. in some legal systems, including those of scotland, south africa, scandinavia, pakistan, india, bangladesh, and the british crown dependencies of jersey, guernsey and the isle of man, the word barrister is also regarded as an honorific title.

    in a few jurisdictions, barristers are usually forbidden from "conducting" litigation, and can only act on the instructions of a solicitor, who performs tasks such as corresponding with parties and the court, and drafting court documents. in england and wales, barristers may seek authorisation from the bar standards board to conduct litigation. this allows a barrister to practise in a 'dual capacity', fulfilling the role of both barrister and solicitor.[1]

    in some countries with common law legal systems, such as new zealand and some regions of australia, lawyers are entitled to practise both as barristers and solicitors, but it remains a separate system of qualification to practise exclusively as a barrister.

  • differences between barristers and other lawyers
  • regulation
  • barristers around the world
  • popular culture
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Barrister
Artist's rendition of an early 19th-century English barrister
Illustration of an early 19th-century English barrister
Occupation
Occupation type
Profession
Activity sectors
Law
Jurisprudence
Justice
Philosophy of law
Politics
Legal history
Human rights
Intellectual property
Description
CompetenciesAdvocacy and interpersonal skills, analytical mind, critical thinking, commercial sense
Education required
England and Wales:
Bar Professional Training Course with pupillage (and possibly Common Professional Examination)
Ireland: Barrister-at-Law degree with pupillage
Fields of
employment
Barristers' chambers, government, sole trader
Related jobs
Pupil barrister, advocate, judge, magistrate, attorney, solicitor

A barrister is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions. Barristers mostly specialise in courtroom advocacy and litigation. Their tasks include taking cases in superior courts and tribunals, drafting legal pleadings, researching the philosophy, hypothesis and history of law, and giving expert legal opinions.

Barristers are distinguished from solicitors, who have more direct access to clients, and may do transactional-type legal work. It is mainly barristers who are appointed as judges, and they are rarely hired by clients directly. In some legal systems, including those of Scotland, South Africa, Scandinavia, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, and the British Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man, the word barrister is also regarded as an honorific title.

In a few jurisdictions, barristers are usually forbidden from "conducting" litigation, and can only act on the instructions of a solicitor, who performs tasks such as corresponding with parties and the court, and drafting court documents. In England and Wales, barristers may seek authorisation from the Bar Standards Board to conduct litigation. This allows a barrister to practise in a 'dual capacity', fulfilling the role of both barrister and solicitor.[1]

In some countries with common law legal systems, such as New Zealand and some regions of Australia, lawyers are entitled to practise both as barristers and solicitors, but it remains a separate system of qualification to practise exclusively as a barrister.

Other Languages
Afrikaans: Advokaat
беларуская: Барыстар
brezhoneg: Barrister
Чӑвашла: Барристер
dansk: Barrister
Deutsch: Barrister
español: Barrister
français: Barrister
Gaeilge: Abhcóide
galego: Barrister
한국어: 법정 변호사
Bahasa Indonesia: Barrister
italiano: Barrister
ქართული: ბარისტერი
lietuvių: Baristeris
日本語: 法廷弁護士
norsk nynorsk: Skrankeadvokat
polski: Barrister
português: Barrister
русский: Барристер
српски / srpski: Баристер
українська: Баристер
اردو: بیرسٹر
中文: 大律師