Antioch

Antioch on the Orontes
Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Ὀρόντου (in Ancient Greek)
Antiochia su Oronte.PNG
Map of Antioch in Roman and early Byzantine times
Antioch is located in Turkey
Antioch
Shown within Turkey
Alternate nameSyrian Antioch
LocationAntakya, Hatay Province, Turkey
Coordinates36°12′19.8″N 36°10′18.5″E / 36°12′19.8″N 36°10′18.5″E / 36.205500; 36.171806
TypeSettlement
Area15 km2 (5.8 sq mi)
History
BuilderSeleucus I Nicator
Founded300 BC
PeriodsHellenistic to Medieval
CulturesGreek, Roman, Armenian, Arab, Turkish
EventsFirst Crusade
Site notes
Excavation dates1932–1939
ConditionMostly buried

Antioch on the Orontes (k/; Ancient Greek: Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Ὀρόντου, translit. Antiókheia hē epì Oróntou; also Syrian Antioch)[note 1] was an ancient Greek city[1] on the eastern side of the Orontes River. Its ruins lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey, and lends the modern city its name.

Antioch was founded near the end of the fourth century BC by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals. The city's geographical, military, and economic location benefited its occupants, particularly such features as the spice trade, the Silk Road, and the Royal Road. It eventually rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East. It was also the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Most of the urban development of Antioch was done during the Roman Empire, when the city was one of the most important in the eastern Mediterranean area of Rome's dominions.

Antioch was called "the cradle of Christianity" as a result of its longevity and the pivotal role that it played in the emergence of both Hellenistic Judaism and early Christianity.[2] The Christian New Testament asserts that the name "Christian" first emerged in Antioch.[3] It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis, and its residents were known as Antiochenes. The city was a metropolis of half a million people during Augustan times, but it declined to relative insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes, and a change in trade routes, which no longer passed through Antioch from the far east following the Mongol invasions and conquests.

Geography

Two routes from the Mediterranean, lying through the Orontes gorge and the Beilan Pass, converge in the plain of the Antioch Lake (Balük Geut or El Bahr) and are met there by

  1. the road from the Amanian Gate (Baghche Pass) and western Commagene, which descends the valley of the Karasu River to the Afrin River,
  2. the roads from eastern Commagene and the Euphratean crossings at Samosata (Samsat) and Apamea Zeugma (Birejik), which descend the valleys of the Afrin and the Quweiq rivers, and
  3. the road from the Euphratean ford at Thapsacus, which skirts the fringe of the Syrian steppe. A single route proceeds south in the Orontes valley.[4]
Other Languages
Afrikaans: Antiogië
ܐܪܡܝܐ: ܐܢܛܝܘܟܝܐ
تۆرکجه: انطاکیه
Bân-lâm-gú: Antiochia
беларуская: Антыёхія
български: Антиохия
Чӑвашла: Антиохи
čeština: Antiochie
Cymraeg: Antiochia
eesti: Antakya
Esperanto: Antioĥio
euskara: Antiokia
فارسی: انطاکیه
français: Antioche
Gaeilge: Aintíoch
հայերեն: Անտիոք
Bahasa Indonesia: Antiokhia
עברית: אנטיוכיה
ქართული: ანტიოქია
Kiswahili: Antiokia
magyar: Antiokheia
македонски: Антиохија
മലയാളം: അന്ത്യോഖ്യ
Bahasa Melayu: Antokiah
монгол: Антиох
Napulitano: Antiochia
norsk nynorsk: Antiokia
پنجابی: انطاکیہ
português: Antioquia
română: Antiohia
русский: Антиохия
Scots: Antioch
Simple English: Antioch
slovenčina: Antiochia
slovenščina: Antiohija
کوردی: ئەنتاکیا
suomi: Antiokia
Tagalog: Antioch
українська: Антіохія
Tiếng Việt: Antiochia
中文: 安提阿