Albany Congress

The Albany Congress
Albany Conference
Congress of seven British American Colonies
Coat of arms or logo
Delegates converse outside the Stadt Huys during the Albany Congress
Type
Type
History
EstablishedJune 19, 1754
DisbandedJuly 11, 1754
Succeeded byStamp Act Congress
Leadership
Governor
Secretary
Seats21 from 7 colonies
Meeting place
Stadt Huys, Albany, New York

The Albany Congress (also known as "The Conference of Albany") was a meeting of representatives sent by the legislatures of seven of the thirteen British colonies in British America: Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. Northernmost Newfoundland and Nova Scotia were not in attendance. Representatives met daily at the Stadt Huys in Albany, New York, from June 18 to July 11, 1754, to discuss better relations with the American Indian tribes and common defensive measures against the French threat from Canada in the opening stage of the French and Indian War, the North American front of the Seven Years' War between Great Britain and France.

Delegates did not have the goal of creating an American nation; rather, they were colonists with the more limited mission of pursuing a treaty with the Mohawks and other major Iroquois tribes.[1] This was the first time that American colonists had met together, and it provided a model that came into use in setting up the Stamp Act Congress in 1765, as well as the First Continental Congress in 1774, which were preludes to the American Revolution.

Previous colonial unions and congresses

The Albany Congress was the first time in the 18th century that American colonial representatives met to discuss some manner of formal union. In the 17th century, some New England colonies had formed a loose association called the New England Confederation, principally for purposes of defense, as raiding was frequent by French and allied Indian tribes. In the 1680s, the British Government created the Dominion of New England as a unifying government on the colonies between the Delaware River and Penobscot Bay; it was dissolved in 1689. Jacob Leisler summoned an intercolonial congress which met in New York on 1 May 1690 to plan concerted action against the French and Indians.[2] Because of differences in threat, he attracted only the colonies as far south as Maryland.[3]

Other Languages
Bahasa Indonesia: Kongres Albany